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2004年 英文 中國史書訊

2003年

本欄啟始日期:2003年7月25日

最近更新日期:2004年1月23日

本欄排序原則:依月份與編輯作業之順序。

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Collecting The Self: Body And Identity In Strange Tale Collections Of Late Imperial China (Sinica Leidensia), by SING-CHEN LYDIA CHIANG, Brill Academic Pub (December 31, 2004).
Material Virtue: Ethics And The Body In Early China (Sinica Leidensia), by MARK CSIKSZENTMIKHALYI, Brill Academic Publishers (December 31, 2004).
Rhetoric And The Discourses Of Power In Court Culture: China, Europe, And Japan, by David R. Knechtges, Eugene Vance, University of Washington Press (December 31, 2004)
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
David Knechtges is professor of Chinese literature and Eugene Vance is professor of French and Italian studies, both at the University of Washington. Other contributors are Robert Borgen (University of California, Davis), Steven D. Carter (University of California, Irvine), Robert Joe Cutter (University of Wisconsin–Madison), Paul Dutton (Simon Fraser University), Ronald Egan (University of California, Santa Barbara), Stephen Owen (Harvard University), Arjo Vanderjagt (University of Groningen), Kuo-ying Wang (National Taiwan University), Scott Waugh (University of California, Los Angeles), and Pauline Yu (University of California, Los Angeles).

Product Description:
Key imperial and royal courts--in Han, Tang, and Song dynasty China; medieval and renaissance Europe; and Heian and Muromachi Japan--are examined in this comparative and interdisciplinary volume as loci of power and as entities that establish, influence, or counter the norms of a larger society. Contributions by twelve scholars are organized into sections on the rhetoric of persuasion, taste, communication, gender, and natural nobility. Writing from the perspectives of literature, history, and philosophy, the authors examine the use and purpose of rhetoric in their respective areas.

In Rhetoric of Persuasion, we see that in both the third-century court of the last Han emperor and the fourteenth-century court of Edward II, rhetoric served to justify the deposition of a ruler and the establishment of a new regime. Rhetoric of Taste examines the court’s influence on aesthetic values in China and Japan, specifically literary tastes in ninth-century China, the melding of literary and historical texts into a sort of national history in fifteenth-century Japan, and the embrace of literati painting innovations in twelfth-century China during a time when the literati themselves were out of favor. Rhetoric of Communication considers official communications to the throne in third-century China, the importance of secret communications in Charlemagne’s court, and the implications of the use of classical Chinese in the Japanese court during the eighth and ninth centuries. Rhetoric of Gender offers the biography of a former Han emperor’s favorite consort and studies the metaphorical possibilities of Tang palace plaints. Rhetoric of Natural Nobility focuses on Dante’s efforts to confirm his nobility of soul as a poet, surmounting his non-noble ancestry, and the development of the texts that supported the political ideologies of the fifteenth-century Burgundian dukes Philip the Good and Charles the Bold.

The Sacred Village: Social Change and Religious Life in Rural North China, by Thomas David DuBois, University of Hawaii Press (December 31, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
Paul R. Katz, Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica
"Adds a new and exciting perspective to our understanding of Chinese rural society."

About the Author
Thomas David DuBois is assistant professor of history at the National University of Singapore.

Product Description:
Until recently, few villagers of rural North China ventured far from their homes. Their intensely local view of the world included knowledge of the immanent sacred realm, which derived from stories of divine revelations, cures, and miracles that circulated among neighboring villages. These stories gave direction to private devotion and served as a source of expert information on who the powerful deities were and what role they played in the human world. The structure of local society also shaped public devotion, as different groups expressed their economic and social concerns in organized worship. While some of these groups remained structurally intact in the face of historical change, others have changed dramatically, resulting in new patterns of religious organization and practice.

The Sacred Village introduces local religious life in Cang County, Hebei Province, as a lens through which to view the larger issue of how rural Chinese perspectives and behaviors were shaped by the sweeping social, political, and demographic changes of the last two centuries. Thomas DuBois combines new archival sources in Chinese and Japanese with his own fieldwork to produce a work that is compelling and intimate in detail. This dual approach also allows him to address the integration of external networks into local society and religious mentality and posit local society as a particular sphere in which the two are negotiated and transformed. The book presents fascinating and important aspects of local religious life: the production of religious knowledge, the significance of formal ecclesiastical structures, the rise of new religious movements, millenarianism during the Japanese occupation, the ongoing place of sectarian groups in ritual life, and the relationship between religion and the village community.

The Sacred Village is the first study in English to discuss the entirety of North Chinese local religion in a holistic manner and over an extended period of time. It adds a new dimension to classic studies of the area that will be appreciated by students and scholars of modern Chinese history and society and adds to our larger understanding of how local religion is changed by forces from both within and without.

Tang China And The Collapse Of The Uighur Empire: A Documentary History (Brill's Inner Asian Library), by MICHAEL R. DROMPP, Brill Academic Publishers (December 31, 2004).
Diary of a Manchu Soldier in Seventeenth-Century China, by Nicola Di Cosmo, Routledge/Curzon; 1st edition (December 30, 2004).
Mao's Road to Power: Revolutionary Writings 1912-1949: New Democracy (1939-1941) (Mao's Road to Power: Revolutionary Writings, 1912-1949), by Stuart R. Schram, East Gate Book (December 30, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
From Book News, Inc.
The texts from 1912 to November 1920 contained in Volume I of this edition shed light primarily on the life and intellectual development of the young Mao. The present volume introduces a new theme: Mao's activity as a member of two parties, the Chinese Communist Party and the Guomindang, neither of which he controlled, though he played an important role in both. Many of his reports and speeches at this time were therefore produced within an institutional framework that led him, or required him, to adapt his own standpoint to the position of the party or parties involved. Thus, to the biographical framework of the first volume is added a further dimension: that of "party history." Prepared under the auspices of the John King Fairbank Center for East Asian Research, Harvard U. Annotation copyright Book News, Inc. Portland, Or.--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Language Notes
Text: English (translation)
Original Language: Chinese--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.
A Tender Voyage: Children and Childhood in Late Imperial China, by Ping-chen Hsiung, Stanford University Press (December 22, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Ping-chen Hsiung is Director of the Institute of Modern History Academia Sinica, Taiwan. She has recently been Visiting Professor of History at the University of California, Los Angeles and Cornell University, and a Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies, Princeton University.

Product Description:
"A Tender Voyage" is the first full-length study of the history of childhood and children's lives in late imperial China. The author draws on an extraordinary range of sources to analyze both the normative concept of childhood—literary and philosophical—and the treatment and experience of children in China.

The study begins with the history of pediatrics and newborn care and their evolution over time. The author moves on to the social environment of the child, including models of upbringing and expected behavior and the treatment of different kinds of children, including the rebellious and the "gentle" child. She examines the role of the mother, notably her close and complex relations with her sons, and the broader emotional world of children, their relationships with the adults around them, and the destructive power of death. The last section discusses concepts of childhood in China and the West.

The study keeps in view throughout the issue of representation versus practice, the role of memory, and the importance of listening for what is not said.

All Under Heaven : A Complete History of China, by Rayne Kruger, John Wiley & Sons; New Ed edition (December 3, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
Review
“…this work serves as a vital pre-history to the modern nation…” (Lloyds List International, 26 November 2004)

Review
“…this work serves as a vital pre-history to the modern nation…” (Lloyds List International, 26 November 2004)

From the Inside Flap
China is a country with an ancient and highly sophisticated civilization of which the Chinese are justly proud. When many of the countries of Europe were struggling to move beyond mud huts and stone tools, the Chinese already had a highly complex society and were creating works of great beauty.

Although China has for many years been a source of great fascination to the West, its history, for many, remains shrouded in mystery. In this compelling narrative written for the general reader, Rayne Kruger, produces a synthesis of Chinese history, mythology and customs that provides an accessible and enlightening introduction to the history and culture of China.

About the Author
Rayne Kruger was born in South Africa and began his working life in a Johannesburg goldmine before becoming in succession a lawyer, broadcaster and actor. He immigrated to England in 1947 where he joined the BBC. He wrote a number of successful novels, followed by a history of South Africa in 1959, Goodbye Dolly Gray, which has remained in print ever since. An astute businessman, he then founded a property group. He subsequently went into partnership with his wife, the successful restaurateur and cookery school entrepreneur, Prue Leith. He died on 21 December 2002.

Product Description:
The history of China has been one in which beauty and cruelty, sexual and political power have been inexorably intertwined. This ancient and highly sophisticated civilization developed largely in isolation from the West for many thousands of years. It is a civilization that: 

  • developed the compass 1000 years before Europe
  • invented paper 1500 years before Europe
  • invented printing 600 years before Europe
  • developed a calendar 1000 years before the Ancient Greeks

to name just a few of its many achievements. It valued, poetry, scholarship and art, yet produced some of the most notorious tyrants, cruellest warriors and dangerous femmes fatales in history.

In this single volume narrative history of China, Rayne Kruger provides an insight into the compelling history, mythology and culture of China from the first humans to the twentieth century. 

Imperial China and the State Cult of Confucius, by Leon Stover, McFarland & Company (December 2, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Leon Stover, professor emeritus of anthropology at the Illinois Institute of Technology, first taught his new theory of dynastic China at Tokyo University. The author of numerous landmarks of intellectual history, he has also written Stonehenge City (2003), which reveals the site as much more than an array of stones—a metropolitan center heretofore unsuspected. He lives in Chicago.

Product Description:
Initiated during the Former Han Dynasty in 136 B.C., the state cult of Confucius endured for 2407 years as the civil religion of a vast empire that ever-renewed itself despite periodic disunity and barbarian conquests. This was a weak agrarian state whose foundation was a Neolithic peasantry, whose archaic state-idea traces to the dawn of Chinese civilization, and whose ruling elite earned its credentials in civil service examinations based on classic Confucianism dating to pre-imperial times—all centered on the political thinking of a late Bronze Age philosopher.

This work explores the political logic of old China’s archaic civilization, where court protocol was the very essence of a liturgical government whose philosophical basis rested on the scriptural authority of Confucian teachings. Here is the historical paradox (vast empire, weak state) resolved in this book. By looking into the state cult of Confucius and its origins, the illogical begins to look reasonable for the pre-modern conditions of antiquity. Over 100 photographs and drawings are included, along with an appendix covering the Great Chinese Museum of New York and a bibliographic essay offering essential information on important Sinologist works.

Body and Face in Chinese Visual Culture (Harvard East Asian Monographs), by Hung Wu (Editor), Katherine R. Tsiang (Editor), Harvard University Press (December 1, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
Product Description:
Traditionally the "Chinese body" was approached as a totality and explained by sweeping comparisons of the differences that distinguished Chinese examples from their Western counterparts. Recently, scholars have argued that we must look at particular examples of Chinese images of the body and explore their intrinsic conceptual complexity and historical specificity.

The twelve contributors to this volume adopt a middle position. They agree that Chinese images are conditioned by indigenous traditions and dynamics of social interaction, but they seek to explain a general Chinese body and face by charting multiple, specific bodies and faces. All of the chapters are historical case studies and investigate particular images, such as Han dynasty tomb figurines; Buddhist texts and illustrations; pictures of deprivation, illness, deformity, and ghosts; clothing; formal portraiture; and modern photographs and films. From the diversity of art forms and historical periods studied, there emerges a more complex picture of ways that the visual culture of the body and face in China has served to depict the living, memorialize the dead, and present the unrepresentable in art.

The Chronicles Of The East India Company Trading To China, 1635-1834, by Hosea Ballou Morse, Global Oriental (December 1, 2004).
China's Great Convulsion, 1894-1924: How Chinese Overthrew a Dynasty, Fought Chaos and Warlords, and Still Helped the Western Allies Win World War One, by John Fulton Lewis, Sun on Earth Books (December, 2004).
The International Relations Of The Chinese Empire, by Hosea Ballou Morse, Global Oriental (December 1, 2004).
Published over a period of eight years, from 1910 to 1918, Morse’s survey provides in scrupulous detail every aspect of China’s political and trading relations with her neighbours as well as with the west, from the mid-nineteenth century to the downfall of the empire, and its aftermath.
Gutenberg in Shanghai: Chinese Print Capitalism, 1876-1937, by Christopher A. Reed, University of Hawaii Press (December 1, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
A graduate of McGill University and of the universities of Glasgow and of California at Berkeley, Christopher A. Reed is a member of the History Department at The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Product Description:
In the mid-1910s, what historians call the "Golden Age of Chinese Capitalism" began, accompanied by a technological transformation that included the drastic expansion of China’s "Gutenberg revolution." Gutenberg in Shanghai is a brilliant examination of this process. It finds the origins of that revolution in the country’s printing industries of the late imperial period and analyzes their subsequent development in the Republican era.

Under diverse social, political, and economic influences, this technological and cultural revolution saw woodblock printing replaced with Western mechanical processes. This book, which relies on documents previously unavailable to both Western and Chinese researchers, demonstrates how Western technology and evolving traditional values resulted in the birth of a unique form of print capitalism whose influence on Chinese culture was far-reaching and irreversible. Its conclusion contests scholarly arguments that view China’s technological development as slowed by culture, or that interpret Chinese modernity as mere cultural continuity.

A vital reevaluation of Chinese modernity, Gutenberg in Shanghai will appeal to scholars of Chinese history. Likewise, it will be enthusiastically received by specialists in cultural studies, political science, sociology, the history of the book, and the anthropology of science and technology.--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

The Yijing and Chinese Politics: Classical Commentary and Literati Activism in the Northern Song Period, 960-1127, by Tze-Ki Hon, Suny Press (December 1, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
From the Publisher
Discusses interpretations of the Yijing (the I Ching or Book of Changes) during the Northern Song period and how these illuminate the momentous changes in Chinese society during this era.

Product Description:
This book is the first comprehensive study of Yijing (Book of Changes) commentary during the Northern Song period, showing how it reflects a coming to terms with major political and social changes. Seen as a transitional period in China's history, the Northern Song (960–1127) is often described as the midpoint in the Tang-Song transition or as the beginning of Song-Ming Neo-Confucianism. Challenging this traditional view, Tze-ki Hon demonstrates the complexity of the Northern Song by breaking it into three periods characterized by, alternately, the reestablishment of civil governance, large-scale reforms, and a descent into factional rivalry. To illustrate the distinct characteristics of these three periods, Hon compares commentaries by Hu Yuan, Zhang Zai, and Cheng Yi with five other Yijing commentaries, highlighting the broad parameters, as well as the specific content, of an extremely important world of discourse—the debate on literati activism. These differing views on the literati's role in civil governance prove how lively, diverse, and intense Northern Song intellectual life was, while also reminding us how important it is to understand the history of the period on its own terms.
China's American Daughter: Ida Pruitt, 1888-1985, by Marjorie King, Chinese University Press (November 30, 2004).
China: Dawn Of A Golden Age (200-750 Ad)., by James C. Y. Watt, Prudence Oliver Harper, Yale University Press (November 30, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
James C.Y. Watt is Brooke Russell Astor Chairman, Department of Asian Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Product Description:
The first comprehensive survey of the spectacular art produced in China during a pivotal era in its history

From the fall of the Han dynasty at the turn of the third century to the eventual reunification of the country under the Sui at the turn of the seventh century, China experienced a tumultuous and fascinating political and cultural history. The political fragmentation that occurred between the dynasties and the massive migration of nomadic peoples into China resulted in contact with people from every part of Asia and the introduction of foreign ideas, religion, art forms, and motifs. Out of this grew the magnificent art of Tang China in the early eighth century.

This book is the first comprehensive survey of Chinese art during this complex era. Lavishly illustrated and produced, the volume presents more than three hundred recent archaeological finds: including gold artifacts made by the nomadic peoples from Mongolia, luxury articles of glass and precious metals from Western and Central Asia, early Chinese Buddhist sculptures, and spectacular works in every medium from the Tang period. Essays by distinguished scholars provide a historical background, discuss the various media, and trace the changes in art styles over a period that saw a radical modification of Chinese civilization.

In the great tradition of publications on Chinese art from the Metropolitan Museum, China: Dawn of a Golden Age will become an essential text for years to come.

• This book is the catalogue for a major exhibition at The Metropolitan Museum of Art (October 5, 2004 to January 23, 2005).

James C.Y. Watt is Brooke Russell Astor Chairman, Department of Asian Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Masterpieces of Chinese Art from the Early Middle Ages (200–750 AD)
James C. Y. Watt

Published to coincide with and complement the major exhibition catalogue China: Dawn of a Golden Age (200–750 AD), this book is an accessible introduction to the art of this period. Included is James C. Y. Watt’s informative introductory essay, along with descriptive texts and color illustrations for a selection of the art in the exhibition: eighty objects chosen for their beauty and importance.

They Were In Nanjing: The Nanjing Massacre Witnessed By American And British Nationals, by Suping Lu, Hong Kong Univ Press (November 30, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Suping Lu is associate professor of the university libraries, University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Product Description:
Using newly uncovered eye-witness material left behind by American and British journalists, missionaries, and diplomats, this book revisits the horror-filled days following the Japanese capture of Nanjing in December 1937.
Illuminations From The Past: Trauma, Memory, And History In Modern China (Cultural Memory in the Present), by Ban Wang, Stanford University Press (November 15, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Ban Wang is Associate Professor of Chinese and Comparative Literature at Rutgers University. He is the author of "The Sublime Figure of History" (Stanford, 1997).

Product Description:
This book offers a cultural history of modern China by looking at the tension between memory and history. Mainstream books on China tend to focus on the hard aspects of economics, government, politics, or international relations. This book takes a humanistic look at modern changes and examines how Chinese intellectuals and artists experienced trauma, social upheavals, and transformations. Drawing on a wide array of sources in political and aesthetic writings, literature, film, and public discourse, the author has portrayed the unique ways the Chinese imagine and portray their own historical destiny in the midst of trauma, catastrophe, and runaway globalization.
The United States 15th Infantry Regiment in China, 1912-1938, by Alfred Emile Cornebise, McFarland & Company (November 3, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Alfred Emile Cornebise is professor emeritus of History at the University of Northern Colorado and also the author of The CCC Chronicles (2004). He lives in Greeley, Colorado.

Product Description:
Taking up its position astride the Peking-Mukden [Beijing-Shenyang] railway beginning in January, 1912, the United States Fifteenth Infantry Regiment was engaged in protecting American interests in China. The 1000 man force was especially challenged during the 1920s, those tumultuous years when warlords struggled to gain ascendancy in the Chinese Republic. Although Chiang Kai-shek established a measure of control in China by 1928, the regiment remained in China—partially to counter Japan’s increasingly aggressive actions—despite considerable misgivings within and outside of the United States Army as to the feasibility, desirability, and ethical appropriateness of the policy retaining it there. The success of the Japanese in conquering much of eastern China finally compelled Washington to withdraw the regiment on March 2, 1938.

This work recounts and assesses some aspects of the involvement and service of the Fifteenth Infantry Regiment during its fateful quarter of a century in the Orient between the World Wars. Also detailed is the Army’s service in those years in general. Many insights are provided regarding the self-perceptions of a key generation of U.S. military personnel deployed there.

Borrowed Gods and Foreign Bodies: Christian Missionaries Imagine Chinese Religion, by Eric Reinders, University of California Press (November 1, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
From the Back Cover
"This is truly a multidisciplinary work. Reinders raises profound questions about how people from one culture view people in another. The materials Reinders richly mines in this book reveal to a Western readership so much about itself. Skillful and crisp, Borrowed Gods is extremely well written, and will no doubt appeal to an audience of students, scholars, and lay readers alike."-John Berthrong, Boston University School of Theology, author of All Under Heaven: Transforming Paradigms in Confucian-Christian Dialogue

About the Author
Eric Reinders is Assistant Professor of Religion at Emory University.

Product Description:
To the Victorians, the Chinese were invariably "inscrutable." The meaning and provenance of this impression-and, most importantly, its workings in nineteenth-century Protestant missionary encounters with Chinese religion-are at the center of Eric Reinders's Borrowed Gods and Foreign Bodies, an enlightening look at how missionaries' religious identity, experience, and physical foreignness produced certain representations of China between 1807 and 1937. Reinders first introduces the imaginative world of Victorian missionaries and outlines their application of mind-body dualism to the dualism of self and other. He then explores Western views of the Chinese language, especially ritual language, and Chinese ritual, particularly the kow-tow. His work offers surprising and valuable insight into the visceral nature of the Victorian response to the Chinese-and, more generally, into the nineteenth-century Western representation of China. Illustrations: 10 line illustrations
From Shanghai to Shanghai: The War Diary of an Imperial Japanese Army Medical Officer, 1937-1941, by TETSUO ASO, Eastbridge (November 1, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
Japan Times
"…first-rate historical testimony…" —

About the Author
Dr. Aso Tetsuo was quite literally born into a world of gynecology and prostitution. His father was a gynecologist with a private medical and teaching practice in the "entertainment quarters" — red light district — of Fukuoka. Besides being a school for midwives, Aso’s childhood home was a medical clinic for the prostitutes employed in the neighboring teahouses and brothels. As a child, Aso knew the women who were his father’s patients as his "big sisters". It was only natural, Aso later reflected, that when he grew up he would become a gynecologist and specialize in the health of working women.

After the end of the war in 1945, Aso was frequently accused by the press of having forced women into prostitution during the war. This prompted him finally to tell his side of the story by compiling this remarkable book from his wartime diary.

Hal Gold is a writer and translator resident in Japan. His latest book, a historical novel, is Neutral War.

Product Description:
"My war records are of military comfort women…", writes Dr. Aso, "…cabaret dance girls, the military secret service, missionaries, and . . . the incident". The "incident", as it is often referred to in books about Japanese comfort women, alludes to the fact that Dr. Aso (1910–1989) was the first Japanese medical officer officially ordered to perform health examinations on military comfort women. This policy was instituted in 1937 for a new contingent of comfort women freshly sent to Shanghai to serve the Japanese military. It was the initial measure undertaken by the Japanese High Command to reduce venereal disease among the troops. Dr. Aso performed this duty throughout the term of his assignment in China.

From Shanghai to Shanghai (Shanhai yori Shanhai e) is the most unusual, grass-roots diary of Dr. Aso, a 27 year-old gynecologist who takes us with him to work and on his travels throughout China during his various tours of duty in the Sino-Japanese war. The journey begins in late 1937, when he first arrived in Shanghai, and continues for four years, until 1941, when he returned to Japan from Shanghai after tours of duty in Shanghai, in Nanjing, and in a number of other parts of central China.

Treaties And Agreements With And Concerning China, 1894-1919, by John v. a. Macmurray, Global Oriental (November 1, 2004).
Masterpieces of Chinese Art from the Early Middle Ages (200-750 AD), by James Watt, Yale University Press (November 1, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
James C.Y. Watt is Brooke Russell Astor Chairman, Department of Asian Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Product Description:
Published to coincide with and complement the major exhibition catalogue China: Dawn of a Golden Age (200-750 AD), this book is an accessible introduction to the art of this period. Included is James C.Y. Watt's informative introductory essay, along with descriptive texts and color illustrations for a selection of the art in the exhibition: eighty objects chosen for their beauty and importance. For those looking for an excellent introduction to the art of China's Golden Age, Masterpieces of Chinese Art from the Early Middle Ages is a perfect choice.

Gender and Chinese Archaeology (Gender and Archaeology), by Katheryn M. Linduff, Yan Sun, Altamira Press (November, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
Product Description:
Gender and Chinese Archaeology is an edited collection of original articles examining archaeological evidence for gender relations in ancient China.
Chinese Steles: Pre-Buddhist and Buddhist Use of a Symbolic Form, by Dorothy C. Wong, University of Hawaii Press (October 31, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
Peter N. Gregory, Smith College
"A landmark contribution."

About the Author
Dorothy C. Wong is assistant professor of East Asian art at the University of Virginia.

Product Description:
Buddhist steles represent an important subset of early Chinese Buddhist art that flourished during the Northern and Southern Dynasties period (386-581). Adapted from the traditional Chinese stone tablet (bei) used for carving Buddhist images, symbols, and allegorical stories, this hybrid form epitomizes the close interactions and synthesis of indigenous Chinese and Indian Buddhist traditions on many levels: religious, social, cultural, and artistic. The phenomenon of Buddhist steles lasted only about a century (from the late fifth through the sixth century), yet this brief period yielded many works of superb artistic quality. These steles also offer important insights into the role Buddhism played in the history and culture of early medieval China and the process of adaptation and transformation by which the foreign religion was assimilated into Chinese society and became part of its civilization.

More than two hundred Chinese Buddhist steles are known to have survived. Their brilliant imagery has long captivated scholars, yet until now the Buddhist stele as a unique art form has received little scholarly attention. Dorothy Wong rectifies that insufficiency by providing in this well-illustrated volume the first comprehensive investigation of this group of Buddhist monuments. She traces the ancient roots of the Chinese stele tradition and investigates the process by which Chinese steles were adapted for Buddhist use. She arranges the known corpus of Buddhist steles into broad chronological and regional groupings and analyzes not only their form and content but also the nexus of complex issues surrounding this art form--from cultural symbolism to the interrelations between religious doctrine and artistic expression, economic production, patronage, and the synthesis of native and foreign art styles. In her analysis of Buddhism's dialogue with native traditions, Wong demonstrates how the Chinese artistic idiom planted the seeds for major achievements in figural and landscape arts in the ensuing Sui and Tang periods.

Considering the use of the upright stone by artists in many civilizations, this study of traditional Chinese bei and their Buddhist adaptations contemplates subjects that transcend the steles' own time and place, thus entering the larger discussion of the nature of symbolic forms.

The Taiping Heavenly Kingdom: Rebellion and the Blasphemy of Empire, by Thomas H. Reilly, University of Washington Press (October 31, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Thomas H. Reilly is assistant professor of Chinese history and Asian studies at Pepperdine University.

Product Description:
Occupying much of imperial China’s Yangzi River heartland and costing over twenty million lives, the Taiping Rebellion (1851–1864) was no ordinary peasant revolt. What most distinguished this dramatic upheaval from earlier rebellions was the Taiping faith of the rebels. Inspired by a Protestant missionary tract, the core of the Taiping faith focused on the belief that Shangdi, the high God of classical China, had chosen the Taiping leader, Hong Xiuquan, to establish his Heavenly Kingdom on Earth.

How were the Taiping rebels, professing this new creed, able to mount their rebellion and recruit multitudes of followers in their sweep through the empire? Thomas Reilly argues that the Taiping faith, although kindled by a foreign source, developed into a dynamic new Chinese religion whose conception of the title and position of its sovereign deity challenged the legitimacy of the Chinese empire. The Taiping rebels denounced the divine pretensions of the imperial title and the sacred character of the imperial office as blasphemous usurpations of Shangdi’s title and position. In place of the imperial institution, the rebels called for restoration of the classical system of kingship. Previous rebellions had declared their contemporary dynasties corrupt and therefore in need of revival; the Taiping, by contrast, branded the entire imperial order blasphemous and in need of replacement.

In this study, Reilly emphasizes the Christian elements of the Taiping faith, showing how Protestant missionaries built on the earlier Catholic effort to translate Christianity into a Chinese idiom. Prior studies of the Rebellion have failed to appreciate how Hong Xiuquan’s interpretation of Christianity connected the Taiping faith to an imperial Chinese cultural and religious context. The Taiping Heavenly Kingdom shows how the Bible, in particular a Chinese translation of the Old Testament, profoundly influenced Hong and his followers, leading them to understand the first three of the Ten Commandments as an indictment of the imperial order. The rebels thus sought to destroy imperial culture, along with its institutions and Confucian underpinnings, all of which they regarded as blasphemous. Strongly iconoclastic, the Taiping followers smashed religious statues and imperially approved icons throughout the lands they conquered. By such actions the Taiping Rebellion transformed—at least for its followers but to some extent for all Chinese—how Chinese people thought about religion, the imperial title and office, and the entire traditional imperial and Confucian order.

This book makes a major contribution to the study of the Taiping Rebellion and to our understanding of the ideology of both the rebels and the traditional imperial order they opposed. It will appeal to scholars in the fields of Chinese history, religion, and culture and of Christian theology and church history.

Chinese Dialectics: From Yijing To Marxism, by Chenshan Tian, Lexington Books (October 30, 2004).
Dialectical thought is at the core of Karl Marx's work and all subsequent attempts to build on his legacy: Marxism. And, arguably, Marx's special departure into dialectics represents an anomaly in that tradition and all of Western philosophy. Marxism finds its philosophers in the academy; in trade unions; in former soviet states; in industrial and non-industrial nations and this makes it distinct from all other modern philosophies. It is certainly the most international modern philosophical movement. Chinese Dialectics From Yijing to Marxism is an unparalleled investigation into the conversation between Western Marxism and Chinese, or Eastern Marxism. An autochthonous version of Marxism persists in China coming to fruition through the work of Mao Zedong. Chenshan Tian contends that the conversation between Eastern and Western Marxism results in a striking feature of dialectics that pervades the everyday thinking and speech of ordinary persons in China. No study to date has undertaken the task of tracing the development of Marxism in China through it's ancient philosophical texts. This book is absolutely essential reading in the disciplines of comparative political theory, philosophy, and Asian studies.

About the Author
Chenshan Tian is Special Programs Coordinator, Center for Chinese Studies, Univerity of Hawaii

Emperor K'Ang Hsi of China, by Eloise Talcott Hibbert, International Specialized Book Services (October 30, 2004).
Japan's Imperial Dilemma in China the Tientsin Incident, 1939-1940, by Sebastian Swann, Routledge/Curzon (October 30, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
Product Description:
This book examines the blockade by the Japanese occupying army in China of the British and French settlements in the Chinese Treaty Port of Tientsin in 1939 and why it escalated into a major international issue.
A Nation-State by Construction: Dynamics of Modern Chinese Nationalism, by Suisheng Zhao, Stanford University Press (October 30, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Suisheng Zhao is Associate Professor at the University of Denver's Graduate School of International Studies, and Executive Director of its Center for China-U.S. Cooperation. He is the founder and editor of the "Journal of Contemporary China" and has authored and edited five books.--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Product Description:
This is the first historically comprehensive, up-to-date analysis of the causes, content, and consequences of nationalism in China, an ancient empire that has struggled to construct a nation-state and find its place in a modern world. It shows how Chinese political elites have competed to promote different types of nationalism linked to their political values and interests and imposed them on the nation while trying to repress other types of nationalism. In particular, the book reveals how leaders of the PRC have adopted a pragmatic strategy to use nationalism while struggling to prevent it from turning into a menace rather than a prop.--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.
China Through the Eyes of the West : From Marco Polo to the Last Emperor, by GIANNI GUADALUPI, White Star (October 29, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Gianni Guadalupi, has worked for 30 years as a writer and anthology editor, specializing in travel writing. He edits the Guide Impossibili (Impossible Guides), Antichi Stati (Ancient States), and Grand Tour collections for Franco Maria Ricci. He is the author of The Discovery of the Nile (1997) and The Holy Bible (2003) and edited The World's Greatest Treasures (1998), and Marco Polo (2002), all published by White Star.
Product Description:
China Revealed presents the history of the relationships between Europe and the Celestial Empire of classical antiquity, from the time when the caravans began to bring a divine fabric known as silk to the shores of the Mediterranean from the far-off, mysterious East, up to the fall of the Manchu dynasty in 1911. Through beautifully illustrated maps, ancient engravings, the first black-and-white pictures and color plates, this book describes the incredible experiences of those who ventured into distant Cathay, crossing the endless deserts of Asia and the treacherous oceans-the Franciscan monks who were the first to penetrate the Mongolian steppes, the merchants such as Marco Polo and Ibn Battuta, the Portuguese sailors and Jesuit missionaries who became counsellors to the Son of the Heavens, and many more.
T'ang China : The Rise of the East in World History, by Samuel Adrian M. Adshead, Palgrave Macmillan (October 15, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
S.A.M. Adshead is Professor Emeritus in History at the University of Canterbury in Christchurch, New Zealand.
Product Description:
China's role in world history has been controversial, especially as seen through an economic lens. This book presents an alternative interpretation of that role, less exclusively economic, more broadly based, and focused on the T'ang period, one of China's acknowledged golden ages. It shows how a different China, Buddhist or Taoist rather than Confucian, aristocratic as much as meritocratic, achieved, through openness to the outside world and partnership with its elites, a multiple preeminence in politics, economics, society and the intellect, not unlike that enjoyed by the United States today. Within a looser web of globalization, the T'ang period and its dynamics offers a distant mirror of our own time, casting a new light on issues in contemporary politics.
Religion and the Early Modern State : Views from China, Russia, and the West (Studies in Comparative Early Modern History), by James D. Tracy (Editor), Marguerite Ragnow (Editor), Cambridge University Press (October 25, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
Product Description:
How did state power impinge on the religion of the common people? The contributing historians of this collection uncover the process of "confessionalization", or "acculturation", by which officials of state and church collaborated in ambitious programs of Protestant or Catholic reform. Thirteen essays reveal a spectrum of possibilities which early modern governments tried to achieve by regulating religious life, as well as how religious communities consequently evolved in new directions.
Science and Civilisation in China: Volume 5, Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Part 12, Ceramic Technology (Science and Civilisation in China), by Rose Kerr, et al, Cambridge University Press (October 14, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
Product Description:
How were Chinese pots made, glazed and fired? Why did China discover porcelain more than 1,000 years before the West? What are the effects of China's influence on world ceramics? These questions (and many more) are answered in this history of Chinese ceramic technology, from the late Stone Age to the twenty-first century AD. The non-specialist reader will appreciate its unique coverage of research materials originally published in several languages.
Chinese St. Louis: From Enclave to Cultural Community, by Huping Ling, Temple University Press (October 8, 2004).
Beyond the Neon Lights: Everyday Shanghai in the Early Twentieth Century, by Hanchao Lu, University of California Press (October 1, 2004). Paperback Edition.
Editorial Reviews
China Quarterly
"A riveting and solidly crafted monograph."

Geographical Review
"Every page is a joy to read."

From the Back Cover
"From Hanchao Lu's clear and lively descriptions of Shanghai in the early twentieth century, we learn about the patterns of alleyways, design of row houses, rules for subletting, shapes of door-knockers, springs in rickshaw cushions, calls of hawkers, sidewalk haircuts, factory work, how nightsoil pots were emptied and cleaned, and the responsibility of neighbors to keep their noses in one another's affairs. We understand, in short, the base from which everything else about Shanghai at the time should be understood. A delightful and edifying book."-Perry Link, author of Evening Chats in Beijing

About the Author
Hanchao Lu is Professor of History at Georgia Institute of Technology.

Product Description:
How did ordinary people live through the extraordinary changes that have swept across modern China? How did peasants transform themselves into urbanites? How did the citizens of Shanghai cope with the epic upheavals-revolution, war, and again revolution-that shook their lives? Even after decades of scholarship devoted to modern Chinese history, our understanding of the daily lives of the common people of China remains sketchy and incomplete. In this carefully researched study, Hanchao Lu weaves rich documentary data with ethnographic surveys and interviews to reconstruct the fabric of everyday life in China's largest and most complex city in the first half of this century. Illustrations: 36 b/w photographs, 2 maps, 8 tables
Chan Buddhism (Dimensions of Asian Spirituality), by Peter D. Hershock, University of Hawaii Press (October 1, 2004)
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Peter D. Hershock is coordinator of the Asian Studies Development Program at the East-West Center, Honolulu. He has been a practicing Buddhist since 1982.

Product Description:
Chan Buddhism has become paradigmatic of Buddhist spirituality. Known in Japan as Zen and in Korea as Son, it is one of the most strikingly iconoclastic spiritual traditions in the world. This succinct and lively work clearly expresses the meaning of Chan as it developed in China more than a thousand years ago and provides useful insights into the distinctive aims and forms of practice associated with the tradition, including its emphasis on the unity of wisdom and practice; the reality of "sudden awakening"; the importance of meditation; the use of "shock tactics"; the centrality of the teacher-student relationship; and the celebration of enlightenment narratives, or koans.

Unlike many scholarly studies, which offer detailed perspectives on historical development, or guides for personal practice written by contemporary Buddhist teachers, this volume takes a middle path between these two approaches, weaving together both history and insight to convey to the general reader the conditions, energy, and creativity that characterize Chan. Following a survey of the birth and development of Chan, its practices and spirituality are fleshed out through stories and teachings drawn from the lives of four masters: Bodhidharma, Huineng, Mazu, and Linji. Finally, the meaning of Chan as a living spiritual tradition is addressed through a philosophical reading of its practice as the realization of wisdom, attentive mastery, and moral clarity.

Chinese Commune: A Communist Experiment That Failed (Chinese Studies, 37), by George P. Jan, Edwin Mellen Press (October 1, 2004).
Encyclopaedia Sinica, by Samuel Couling, Global Oriental (October 1, 2004).
Homoerotic Sensibilities in Late Imperial China, by Wu Cuncun, CUNCUN WU, Routledge/Curzon (October 1, 2004).
Macartney at Kashgar, by Pamela Nightingale, C.P. Skrine, RoutledgeCurzon (October 1, 2004).
The Other Middle Kingdom: A Brief History Of Muslims In China (Asian Studies (University of Indianapolis Press))
by chiara Betta, University of Indianapolis Press (October 1, 2004).
A Study of Chinese Alchemy, by Obed Simon, Ph.D. Johnson, Martino Publishing (October 1, 2004)
Editorial Reviews

1928. This volume contains an investigation concerning the origin and development of Chinese alchemy, wherein evidence is submitted for a probable connection between the alchemy of China and that of medieval Europe.
Foreign Mud: Being an Account of the Opium Imbroglio at Canton 1947, by Maurice Collis, Kessinger Publishing (October, 2004).
Ritual Music in a North China Village: The Continuing Confucian and Buddhist Heritage (Chinese Music Monograph), by Yaxiong Du, Chinese Music Society of North America (October, 2004).
Water Frontier: Commerce and the Chinese in the Lower Mekong Region, 1750-1880 (World Social Change), by Nola Cooke, TANA LI, Singapore University Press (October, 2004).
Drawing Boundaries: Architectural Images in Qing China, by Anita Chung, University of Hawaii Press (October 1, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
Patricia Berger, University of California, Berkeley
"Anita Chung's thoroughly researched work will be a very welcome addition to the literature on Qing painting."

About the Author
Anita Chung is Mellon Research Fellow in Chinese Art at the Cleveland Museum of Art.

Product Description:
Qing China (1644–1912) witnessed a resurgence in architectural painting, a traditional subject category known as jiehua, or boundary painting. Drawing Boundaries concerns itself with the symbolic implications of this impressive and little studied reflorescence. Beginning with a concise and well-illustrated history of the evolution of the tradition, this exciting new study reveals how these images were deployed in the Manchu (Qing) imperial court to define political, social, or cultural boundaries. Characterized by grand conception and regal splendor, the paintings served to enhance the imperial authority of rulers and, to a segment of the elite, to advertise social status. Drawing Boundaries thus speaks to both issues of painting and architectural style and the discourse of powerful cultural forms. In addition to the analysis of how the style of image construction suggests these political and social motivations, the book identifies another aspect of traditional architectural representation unique to the Qing: the use of architectural representation to render form and space. Anita Chung makes the fascinating observation that these renderings create an overwhelming sense of "being there," a characteristic, she argues, that underscores the Qing concern for the substance of things--a sensibility toward the physical world characteristic of the period and emblematic of a new worldview.

Handsomely illustrated, Drawing Boundaries is the first full-length study of an important tradition of premodern Chinese art and architecture. It presents a thoroughly researched examination of Qing architectural painting (including a number of translations of little-known texts) as well as a means of placing these works, frequently dismissed as merely gorgeous renderings, into a cultural context. Here is a major contribution to the field of Chinese art and architectural history and a welcome avenue of understanding for historians of Chinese society and politics and those with an interest in material culture.

Han-mongol Encounters & Missionary Endeavors: A History Of Scheut In Ordos, Hetao, 1874-1911 (Leuven Chinese Studies), by Patrick Taveirne, Leuven Univ Pr (September 30, 2004)
Workers At War: Labor In China's Arsenals, 1937-1953, by Joshua H. Howard, Stanford University Press (September 15, 2004)
Editorial Reviews

About the Author
Joshua H. Howard is Croft Assistant Professor of East Asian History and International Studies at the University of Mississippi.

Product Description:
This book focuses on the lives, struggles, and contrasting perspectives of the 60,000 workers, military administrators, and technical staff employed in the largest, most strategic industry of the Nationalist government, the armaments industry based in the wartime capital, Chongqing. The author argues that China's arsenal workers participated in three interlocked conflicts between 1937 and 1953: a war of national liberation, a civil war, and a class war.

The work adds to the scholarship on the Chinese revolution, which has previously focused primarily on rural China, showing how workers’ alienation from the military officers directing the arsenals eroded the legitimacy of the Nationalist regime and how the Communists mobilized working-class support in Chongqing. Moreover, in stressing the urban, working-class, and nationalist components of the 1949 revolution, the author demonstrates the multiple sources of workers’ identities and thus challenges previous studies that have exclusively stressed workers’ particularistic or regional identities.

The Boat And The City: Chinese Diaspora And The Morphology Of Southeast Asian Coastal Cities, by Johannes Widodo, Eastern Univ Pr (September 1, 2004).
The System of Taxation in China in the Tsing Dynasty, 1644-1911 (Studies in History, Economics, and Public Law, No. 143.) by Shao-Kwan Chen, Lawbook Exchange; (September 1, 2004).
China Made : Consumer Culture and the Creation of the Nation (Harvard East Asian Monographs), by Karl Gerth, Harvard University Press (September 1, 2004)(平裝本)
Editorial Reviews

"Chinese people should consume Chinese products!"

This slogan was the catchphrase of a movement in early twentieth-century China that sought to link consumption and nationalism by instilling a concept of China as a modern "nation" with its own "national products." From fashions in clothing to food additives, from museums to department stores, from product fairs to advertising, this movement influenced all aspects of China's burgeoning consumer culture. Anti-imperialist boycotts, commemorations of national humiliations, exhibitions of Chinese products, the vilification of treasonous consumers, and the promotion of Chinese captains of industry helped enforce nationalistic consumption and spread the message--patriotic Chinese bought goods made of Chinese materials by Chinese workers in factories owned and run by Chinese.

In China Made, Karl Gerth argues that two key forces shaping the modern world--nationalism and consumerism--developed in tandem in China. Early in the twentieth century, nationalism branded every commodity as either "Chinese" or "foreign," and consumer culture became the place where the notion of nationality was articulated, institutionalized, and practiced. Based on Chinese, Japanese, and English-language archives, magazines, newspapers, and books, this first exploration of the historical ties between nationalism and consumerism reinterprets fundamental aspects of modern Chinese history and suggests ways of discerning such ties in all modern nations.

Marrow of the Nation: A History of Sport and Physical Culture in Republican China (Asia: Local Studies / Global Themes, 10), by Andrew D. Morris, Joseph S. Alter, University of California Press (September 1, 2004).
Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover
"This is the first book about how new ideas of sport and the body shaped the Chinese nation in its early formative years. It is a much-needed contribution toward understanding the origins of China's long quest to host an Olympic Games. This engaging book presents little-known material gleaned with great skill from archives in China, Taiwan, and the U.S. Informed by current theoretical debates, it pulls together in a sophisticated way the pieces of the complex relationship between the body and the nation in China, and it offers creative interpretations of this pivotal period in Chinese history."-Susan Brownell, author of Training the Body for China: Sports in the Moral Order of the People's Republic

"Andrew Morris gives us a clear and compelling account of the origins of modern sports in China. As reigning authority on the topic he is an ideal guide to the complexity and power of organized sports in Chinese social, cultural, and political life. An outstanding work that provides welcome historical background and invaluable insights in the run-up to the 2008 Beijing Olympics."-David Strand, author of Rickshaw Beijing: City People and Politics in the 1920s

Product Description:
By 1907, staff at the Tianjin YMCA were rallying their Chinese charges with the cry: When will China be able to send a winning athlete to the Olympic contests? When will China be able to invite all the world to Peking for an International Olympic contest? Nearly a century later, on the eve of China's first-ever Olympic games, this innovative book shows for the first time how sporting culture and ideology played a crucial role in the making of the modern nation-state in Republican China. A landmark work on the history of sport in China, Marrow of the Nation tells the dramatic story of how Olympic-style competitions and ball games, as well as militarized forms of training associated with the West and Japan, were adapted to become an integral part of the modern Chinese experience. Illustrations: 14 b/w photographs, 1 line drawing, 9 tables

Rituals Of Recruitment In Tang China: Reading An Annual Programme In The Collected Statements By Wang Dingbao (870-940) (Sinica Leidensia), by OLIVER J. MOORE, Brill Academic Publishers (September 1, 2004).
Travels In Tartary, Thibet And China, 1844-1846 (Broadway Travellers), by Evariste-Regis Huc, Gabet, Routledge; Reprint edition (September 1, 2004).
The Travels Of An Alchemist: The Journey Of The Taoist Ch'ang-ch'un From China To The Hundukush At The Summons Of Chingiz Khan (Broadway Travellers), by Li Chih-Ch'ang, Arthur Waley, Routledge; Reprint edition (September 1, 2004).
The Travels Of Marco Polo (Broadway Travellers), by Marco Polo, L. F. Benedetto, Routledge; Reprint edition (September 1, 2004)
American War Production Mission in China, 1944-1945 (Research Collections in American Politics), by by Robert Lester (Other Contributor)LexisNexis (September, 2004)
Old Advertisements And Popular Culture: Posters, Calendars And Cigarettes, 1900-1950, by Chaonan Chen, Yiyou Feng, Long River Press; (August 31, 2004).
Anthology Of Ink: Ancient Chinese Painting And Calligraphy From The Dr. S. Y. Yip Collection
by Anita Wong, et al, Hong Kong Univ Press (August 31, 2004)
Editorial Reviews
Product Description:
Anthology of Ink features over 80 examples of Chinese painting and calligraphy, dating mainly from the Ming and Qing dynasties. All these masterpieces were from renowned artists, such as Shen Zhou (1407-1509), Wen Zhengming (1407-1559), Zhu Yunming (1460-1526), Wang Hui (1632-1717), Liu Yong (1714-1904) and Ren Xiong (1822-1857) which epitomized both traditional and new styles of different schools in the Ming and Qing periods.
They Were In Nanjing: The Nanjing Massacre Witnessed By American And British Nationals, by Suping Lu ,Hong Kong Univ Press; (August 31, 2004)
Editorial Reviews
Synopsis
The Nanjing Massacre, which took place after the Japanese attacked and captured Nanjing in December 1937, shocked the world with its magnitude and atrocities. With newly uncovered eye-witness material left behind by the American and British journalists, missionaries, and diplomats, They Were In Nanjing takes the readers back in time to revisit the event and live through those horror-filled days. The first-hand accounts range from English media reports, personal records, missionary and Christian organization documents, to American and British diplomatic and military documents. The research yields new discoveries, and presents issues which have previously not been adequately dealt with, for instance, Japanese attacks on American citizens, and losses and damage to American and British properties as a result of Japanese atrocities. No other book on the Nanjing Massacre presents first-hand foreign perspective so thoroughly or consistently.


About the Author
Suping Lu is associate professor of the university libraries, University of Nebraska-Lincoln.
Buddhist Art And Architecture Of China, by Yuheng Bao, et al, Edwin Mellen Pr; (August 30, 2004).
This interdisciplinary study on the development of Buddhist art and architecture in China from the early period till the Qing Dynasty is in a 8½ x 11 format with 50 photo illustrations, the majority of which have never been shown or introduced to the Western world. This outstanding work will be an invaluable resource book particularly for those in the fields of Art History, Architecture and Asian Studies.
The Class of 1761: Examinations, State, and Elites in Eighteenth-Century China, by Iona D. Man-Cheong,Stanford, University Press; (August 30, 2004)
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Iona D. Man-Cheong is Associate Professor of History at the State University of New York at Stony Brook.


Book Description
"The Class of 1761" reveals the workings of China's imperial examination system from the unique perspective of a single graduating class. The author follows the students' struggles in negotiating the examination system along with bureaucratic intrigue and intellectual conflict, as well as their careers across the Empire—to the battlefields of imperial expansion in Annam and Tibet, the archives where the glories of the empire were compiled, and back to the chambers where they in turn became examiners for the next generation of aspirants.

The book explores the rigors and flexibilities of the examination system as it disciplined men for political life and shows how the system legitimated both the Manchu throne and the majority non-Manchu elite. In the system's intricately articulated networks, we discern the stability of the Qing empire and the fault lines that would grow to destabilize it.

Diary of a Manchu Soldier in Seventeenth-Century China, by Nicola Di Cosmo, Routledge/Curzon; 1st edition (August 30, 2004).
This book presents an annotated translation of the only known military diary in pre-modern Chinese history, providing fresh and extensive information on the inner workings of the Ch'ing army. The personal experience of the author, a young Manchu officer fighting in inhospitable south-western China, takes us close to the 'face of the battle' in seventeenth-century China, and enriches our general knowledge of military history.
New Qing Imperial History: The Making of Inner Asian Empire at Qing Chengde, by James A. Millward, et al, Routledge/Curzon; New Ed edition (August 30, 2004)
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
James A. Millward is Associate Professor of History at Georgetown Univeristy. Ruth W. Dunnell is James Storer Associate Professor at Kenyon College. Mark C. Elliot is Associate Professor of Inner Asian Studies at Harvard University. Philippe Foret is Assistant Professor and Associate Researcher at the University of Oklahoma and Paris IV Sorbonne University, France.


Book Description
Uses the Manchu summer capital of Chengde and associated architecture, art and ritual activity as the focus for an exploration of the importance of Inner Asia and Tibet to the Qing Empire (1636-1911).
Speaking of Yangzhou : A Chinese City, 1550-1850 (Harvard East Asian Monographs), by Antonia Finnane, Harvard University Press; (August 30, 2004).
Banner Legacy: The Rise of the Fengtian Local Elite at the End of the Qing (Michigan Monographs in Chinese Studies), by Yoshiki Enatsu, Center for Chinese Studies Publications; (August 16, 2004).
Mao (Routledge Historical Biographies), by Michael Lynch, Routledge; (August 1, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Michael Lynch teaches history at the University of Leicester.


Book Description
Michael Lynch presents an engaging and thorough account of Mao's life and politics, making use of a wealth of primary and secondary sources. He locates Maoism in the broader context of twentieth-century Chinese history, discussing the development of the Chinese Communist Party, the creation of the People's Republic of China and the Cultural Revolution, and the part of Mao's China in the Cold War. Details of Mao's private life as well as his political and philosophical thought add to this diverse picture of the influential leader.
China's Golden Age: Everyday Life in the Tang Dynasty, by Charles D. Benn, Oxford University Press; (August 1, 2004).
The Tang Dynasty (618-907), traditionally regarded as the golden age of China, was a time of patricians and intellectuals, Buddhist monks and Taoist priests, poetry and music, song and dance. In China's Golden Age: Everyday Life in the Tang Dynasty, Charles Benn paints a vivid picture of the lifestyle behind the grandeur of the Tang culture. All aspects of day-to-day life are presented, including crime,entertainment, fashion, marriage, food, hygiene, dwellings, and transportation. Attend an ancient feast to celebrate an imperial birthday, where ale was served in elaborate pitchers before a meal of fourteen hors d'oeuvres and twenty-three courses. Learn which colors concubines used for their eye makeup and beauty marks, and what jealous wives did to discourage such enhancement. See the similarities between today's pubs and the Tang alehouses, where women were hired to dance and sing to encourage patrons to stay longer and spend more money. Decide for yourself why Yangzhou, a city on the Grand Canal close to the Yangtze River, was considered one of the greatest cities in the Tang Dynasty. Benn translates and paraphrases his classical Chinese sources from the Tang era with fresh and polished prose. He also includes his own illustrations of everything from tools and hairstyles to musical instruments and courtyard dwellings. A history of the rise and fall of the dynasty is presented, as is a look at the societal structure of the aristocracy, bureaucracy, eunuchs, clergy, peasants, artisans, merchants, and slaves. This thorough explanation provides fascinating insight into a culture and time that is often misunderstood by Westerners and brings alive both the everyday routine and the timeless splendor of this intellectually and artistically powerful epoch. Enjoy your journey in China's Golden Age, and come back to the present with a greater understanding of this amazing time.
Rituals Of Recruitment In Tang China: Reading An Annual Programme In The Collected Statements By Wang Dingbao (870-940 (Sinica Leidensia), by OLIVER J. MOORE, Brill Academic Pub; (August 1, 2004).
Based on translations of an unique Tang text, the Collected Statements, this work explores a worthy social commentary on the examination life that its compiler witnessed.
Gradually providing a full picture of the civil service examination, it describes the emergence of the literary culture surrounding civil service examination recruitment during China's Tang dynasty (618-907); considers the series of rituals that Tang examination candidates underwent throughout the annual examinations; contrasts lavish court ceremonies of the early Tang period with more private rituals of acknowledgement that became fashionable in the second half of the dynasty.
An annual programme of rituals became the cardinal definition of examination recruitment for both participants and onlookers. With valuable insights into the political and social tensions in the Tang history of competitive examination degrees.

Readership: All those interested in China's social history, rituals and institutions; state and society during the Tang dynasty; examination recruitment; Tang intellectual history.

Oliver Moore, Ph.D. (1993), Chinese History, University of Cambridge, is Lecturer in the Art and Material Culture of China at Leiden University. His publications on aspects of Chinese writing and painting include Reading the Past: Chinese (British Museum Press, 2000).

A Translation of the Ancient Chinese The Book of Burial(Zang Shu) by Guo Pu (276-324) (Chinese Studies :, Vol. 34), by Juwen Zhang, Edwin Mellen Pr; (August 1, 2004).
Across the Perilous Sea : Japanese Trade With China and Korea from the 7th to the 16th Century, by Charlotte Von Verschuer, Cornell Univ East Asia Program; (July 31, 2004).
Economy (A Documentary History of Hong Kong), by David Faure, Pui-Tak Lee, Hong Kong University Press; (July 31, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Dr. David Faure, University Lecturer in Modern Chinese History, University of Oxford, has written extensive about Chinese history and Hong Kong history. In addition to this volume he edited A Documentary History of Hong Kong: Society. Dr. Lee Pui-tak is a research officer and honorary lecturer at the Centre of Asian Studies, The University of Hong Kong. His research interests include the history of Hong Kong and modern China.


Book Description
Economic history deals with daily life, but also goes beyond that to interpret the important turning points which made daily life possible. This book demonstrates why Hong Kong was so successful as a commercial, industrial and financial city at different times in its history and how these major changes made an impact on the life of its people. The documents selected for inclusion illustrate vividly problems confronted by entrepreneur and government at every state in these changes. An outline history provided in the general introduction and to every chapter brings coherence to the different themes which emerge throughout the book.
The Qing Formation in World-Historical Time (Harvard East Asian Monographs), by Lynn A. Struve (Editor), Harvard University Press; (July 31, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
Synopsis
For many years, the Ming and Qing dynasties have been grouped as "late imperial China," a temporal framework that allows scholars to identify and evaluate indigenous patterns of social, economic, and cultural change initiated in the last century of Ming rule that imparted a particular character to state and society throughout the Qing and into the twentieth century. This paradigm asserts the autonomous character of social change in China and has allowed historians to create a "China-centred history." Recently, however, many scholars have begun emphasising the singular qualities of the Qing. Among the contributors to this volume on the formation of the Qing, those who emphasise the Manchu ethos of the Qing tend to see it as part of an early modernity and stress parallel and sometimes mutually reinforcing patterns of political consolidation and cultural integration across Eurasia. Other contributors who examine the Qing formation from the perspective of those who lived through the dynastic transition see the advent of Qing rule as prompting attempts by the Chinese subjects of the new empire to make sense of what they perceived as a historical disjuncture and to rework these understandings into an accommodation to foreign rule. In contrast to the late imperial paradigm, the new ways of configuring the Qing in historical time in both groups of essays assert the singular qualities of the Qing formation.

The Fall Of Hong Kong: Britain, China and the Japanese Occupation, by Philip Snow, Yale University Press; (July 29, 2004)(平裝本)
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Philip Snow is an orientalist educated at Oxford University. The son of the writers C. P. Snow and Pamela Hansford Johnson, he is author of the acclaimed The Star Raft: China’s Encounter with Africa.


Book Description
On Christmas Day 1941 the Japanese captured Hong Kong, and Britain lost control of its Chinese colony for almost four years. The Japanese occupation was a turning point in the slow historical process by which the British were to be expelled from the colony and from four centuries of influence in East Asia. In this powerfully researched narrative, Philip Snow for the first time unravels the dramatic story of the occupation from the viewpoint of all the key players—the Hong Kong Chinese, the British, the Japanese, and the mainland Chinese—and reinterprets the subsequent evolution of Hong Kong in the light of this half-buried episode.

Drawing on an unprecedented range of sources across continents and across languages, Snow reveals what really happened: the widespread desertion of the British by Chinese personnel during the invasion; the acquiescence of the Asian upper class in the Japanese takeover; the vicious cruelty of the Japanese conquerors towards the Chinese masses; and the post-war British decision to draw a veil over the occupation’s murkier aspects. Now, with Hong Kong returned to the Chinese and its future closely tied to the commercial influence of Japan: the colony’s wartime nemesis may hold the key to its survival in the twenty-first century.

Science and Civilisation in China: Volume 7, Science and Chinese Society, Part 2, General Conclusions and Reflections (Science and Civilisation in China), by Joseph Needham (Editor), et al, Cambridge University Press; (July 22, 2004).
Editorial Reviews

Book Description
Joseph Needham, who died in 1995, was the greatest British historian of China of the last 100 years. His Science and Civilisation in China series caused a seismic shift in western perceptions of China, revealed as perhaps the world's most scientifically and technically productive country in pre-modern times. But why did the scientific and industrial revolutions not happen in China? Joseph Needham reflects on possible answers to this question in the concluding volume of this series and provides fascinating insights into his great intellectual quest.
The Survival of Empire : Portuguese Trade and Society in China and the South China Sea 1630-1754, by G. B. Souza, Cambridge University Press; New Ed edition (July 8, 2004)(平裝本、新版)
Editorial Reviews
Synopsis
In this original study of the Portuguese Empire in the East, the Estado da India, George Souza looks in detail at the activities of Macao. His aim is to enquire into the nature of Portuguese society in China and the South China Sea and explain why the political and economic activities of the Portuguese crown did not inhibit the growth of local entrepreneurial trade. He also examines the nature of Portuguese maritime trade in Asia and analyses the focal role of Macao as an adjunct to the Canton market. The operations of Portuguese private merchants, the so-called 'country traders', are described and tellingly assessed in the wider context of the economic development of China and Southeast Asia in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.


Book Description
In this original study of the Portuguese Empire in the East, the Estado da India, George Souza looks in detail at the activities of Macao. His aim is to enquire into the nature of Portuguese society in China and the South China Sea and explain why the political and economic activities of the Portuguese crown did not inhibit the growth of local entrepreneurial trade. He also examines the nature of Portuguese maritime trade in Asia and analyses the focal role of Macao as an adjunct to the Canton market. The operations of Portuguese private merchants, the so-called 'country traders', are described and tellingly assessed in the wider context of the economic development of China and Southeast Asia in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.
Hygienic Modernity : Meanings of Health and Disease in Treaty-Port China (Asia: Local Studies / Global Themes), by Ruth Rogaski, University of California Press; (July 1, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
From the Back Cover
"Brilliantly conceived and superbly researched, this excellent study charts the transnational forces and circulating discourses on health that helped constitute a modern concept of hygiene in China. Over the course of the twentieth century the state, scientists, physicians, and the military all came to participate in the health management of aggregated populations, and eventually in the fitness of the race and nation. Insightfully placed within the context of a global modernity and the layered imperialisms of Japan and the "West," this is transnational history writing at its best. Indeed, it is one of the finest books we now have on modernity in East Asia."-Takashi Fujitani, University of California, San Diego, and author of Perilous Memories: The Asia-Pacific War "Rogaski examines health and disease in the northern Chinese city of Tianjin, from the years before it was opened as a treaty port to the early People's Republic. She shows how weisheng, or "hygienic modernity," was adopted by foreigners and local elites in the service of imperialism, national strength, and revolution. Hygienic Modernity breaks new intellectual ground in our understanding of imperialism, providing local texture and transnational reach. It is ingeniously researched and elegantly argued."-Gail Hershatter, author of Dangerous Pleasures: Prostitution and Modernity in Twentieth-Century Shanghai


Book Description
Placing meanings of health and disease at the center of modern Chinese consciousness, Ruth Rogaski reveals how hygiene became a crucial element in the formulation of Chinese modernity in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Rogaski focuses on multiple manifestations across time of a single Chinese concept, weisheng-which has been rendered into English as "hygiene," "sanitary," "health," or "public health"-as it emerged in the complex treaty-port environment of Tianjin. Before the late nineteenth century, weisheng was associated with diverse regimens of diet, meditation, and self-medication. Hygienic Modernity reveals how meanings of weisheng, with the arrival of violent imperialism, shifted from Chinese cosmology to encompass such ideas as national sovereignty, laboratory knowledge, the cleanliness of bodies, and the fitness of races: categories in which the Chinese were often deemed lacking by foreign observers and Chinese elites alike. Illustrations: 8 b/w photographs, 2 maps, 3 tables

The Role of Japan in Liang Qichao's Introduction of Modern Western Civilization to China (China Research Monographs, No. 57.), by Joshua A. Fogel.
A Treatise on Efficacy: Between Western and Chinese Thinking, by Francois Jullien, Janet Lloyd, University of Hawaii Press; (July 1, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Francois Jullien is professor of Chinese studies in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Paris VII.


Book Description
In this highly insightful analysis of Western and Chinese concepts of efficacy, Francois Jullien subtly delves into the metaphysical preconceptions of the two civilizations to account for diverging patterns of action in warfare, politics, and diplomacy. Although the Western model of efficacy, inherited from the ancient Greeks' conception of action, seeks to attain directly a predetermined goal through voluntary and assertive action, the Chinese tend to evaluate the power inherent in a situation (shi) and transform it through nonassertiveness, relying on the "propensity" of things in such a way that the result takes place of itself. Jullien shows how these Western and Chinese strategies work in several domains (the battlefield, for example) and analyzes two resulting acts of war. The Chinese strategist manipulates his own troops and the enemy to win a battle without waging war and to bring about victory effortlessly. Efficacity in China is thus conceived of in terms of transformation (as opposed to action) and manipulation, making it closer to what is understood as efficacy in the West.

Jullien's brilliant interpretations of an array of recondite texts are key to understanding our own conceptions of action, time, and reality in this foray into the world of Chinese thought. In its clear and penetrating characterization of two contrasting views of reality from a heretofore unexplored perspective, A Treatise on Efficacy will be of central importance in the intellectual debate between East and West.

Taiwan's Imagined Geography : Chinese Colonial Travel Writing and Pictures, 1683-1895 (Harvard East Asian Monographs), by Emma J. Teng, Harvard University Press; (June 30, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
Synopsis
Until 300 years ago, the Chinese considered Taiwan a "land beyond the seas," a "ball of mud" inhabited by "naked and tattooed savages." The incorporation of this island into the Qing empire in the seventeenth century and its evolution into a province by the late nineteenth century involved not only a reconsideration of imperial geography but also a reconceptualisation of the Chinese domain. The annexation of Taiwan was only one incident in the much larger phenomenon of Qing expansionism into frontier areas that resulted in a doubling of the area controlled from Beijing and the creation of a multi-ethnic polity. The author argues that travellers' accounts and pictures of frontiers such as Taiwan led to a change in the imagined geography of the empire. In representing distant Iands and ethnically diverse peoples of the frontiers to audiences in China proper, these works transformed places once considered non-Chinese into familiar parts of the empire and thereby helped to naturalise Qing expansionism. By viewing Taiwan-China relations as a product of the history of Qing expansionism, the author contributes to our understanding of current political events in the region.
China, the Portuguese, and the Nanyang: Oceans and Routes, Regions and Trade (C. 1000-1600) (Variorum Collected Studies Series, 777), by Roderich Ptak, Ashgate Publishing; (June 15, 2004).
Under the Song, Yuan and Ming dynasties, China's maritime trade went through several stages of rapid expansion. This concerns both activities initiated by the central government and private seafaring: Chinese ships would sail to ports in Southeast Asia and the Indian Ocean, and foreign merchants would come to China, often declaring themselves as tribute envoys. In the early 16th century, the Portuguese made contact with the Middle Kingdom, leading to the foundation of Macao in the 1550s. The present volume, the third collection by Roderich Ptak, explores important structural features related to China's maritime ventures and Luso-Chinese relations. It also discusses the perception of maritime space in late medieval Chinese texts and the importance of trade routes, especially the so-called eastern route from Fujian via Luzon to the Sulu 'zone'. The third section presents different 'key' regions as seen through Chinese eyes: Hainan, the coral island in the South China Sea, Barus on Sumatra, and finally Wang Dayuan's chapters on the Kerala coast.

Contents
Introduction; STRUCTURAL ISSUES AND TRADE: Ming maritime trade to southeast Asia, 1368–1567: visions of a system; Sino-Portuguese relations circa 1513/14–1550s; China's medieval fanfang – a model for Macau under the Ming?; Camphor in east and southeast Asian Trade, c. 1500: a synthesis of Portuguese and Asian sources. THE PERCEPTION OF SPACE AND SAILING ROUTES: Quanzhou: at the northern edge of a southeast Asian 'Mediterranean'; Südostasiens Meere nach chinesischen Quellen (Song und Yuan); Jottings on Chinese sailing routes to southeast Asia, especially on the eastern route in Ming times. ISLANDS AND REGIONS: Die Paracel- und Spratly-Inseln in Sung-, Yüan- und frühen Ming-Texten: ein maritimes Grenzgebiet?; Hainans Außenbeziehungen während der frühen Ming-Zeit; Possible Chinese references to the Barus Area (Tang to Ming); Wang Dayuan on Kerala; Index.

Salt and State : An Annotated Translation of the Songshi Salt Monopoly Treatise (Michigan Monographs in Chinese Studies), by Cecilia Chien, U OF M CENTER FOR CHINESE STUDIES; Annotated edition (June 7, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
Book Description

From its inception in the Han dynasty (206 B.C.-220 A.D.), the salt monopoly was a key component in the Chinese government's financial toolkit. Salt, with its highly localized and large-scale production, was an ideal target for bureaucratic management.
In the Song dynasty (960-1279), fiscal pressures on the government had intensified with increased centralization and bureaucratization. A bloated administration and an enormous standing army maintained against incursions by aggressive steppe neighbors placed tremendous strain on Song finances. Developing the salt monopoly seemed a logical and indeed urgent strategy, but each actor in this plan -- the emperor, local officials, monopoly administrators, producers, merchants, and consumers -- had his own interests to protect and advance. Thus attempts to maximize the effectiveness of the monopoly meant frequent policy swings and led to levels of corruption that would ultimately undo the Song.
Unlike other contemporary sources, the Songshi treatise organizes its subject into an intelligible and detailed narrative, elucidating special terminology, the bureaucracy and its processes, and debates relating to Chinese finance and politics, as well as the salt industry itself. Professor Chien's extensive annotation relies on parallel histories that corroborate and supplement the Songshi account, together providing a comprehensive study of this important institution in China's premodern political economy.
Cecilia Chien is Assistant Professor in the Division of Humanities at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology.
The Teachings and Practices of the Early Quanzhen Taoist Masters: Exploring the Realm of Health Care (Suny Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture), by Stephen Eskildsen, State University of New York Press; (June 14, 2004).
Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover
Stephen Eskildsen's book offers an in-depth study of the beliefs and practices of the Quanzhen (Complete Realization) School of Taoism, the predominant school of monastic Taoism in China. The Quanzhen School was founded in the latter half of the twelfth century by the eccentric holy man Wan Zhe (1113-1170), whose work was continued by his famous disciples commonly known as the Seven Realized Ones. This study draws upon surviving texts to examine the Quanzhen masters' approaches to mental discipline, intense asceticism, cultivation of health and longevity, mystical experience, supernormal powers, views of death and dying, charity and evangelism, and ritual. From these primary sources, Eskildsen provides a clear understanding of the nature of Quanzhen Taoism and reveals its core emphasis to be the cultivation of clarity and purity of mind that occurs not only through seated meditation, but also throughout the daily activities of life.


About the Author
Stephen Eskildsen is UC Foundation Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religion at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. He is the author of Asceticism in Early Taoist Religion, also published by SUNY Press.


Book Description
Explores the religion developed by the Quanzhen Taoists, who sought to cultivate the mind not only through seated meditation, but also throughout the daily activities of life.

New Perspectives on China's Past: Twentieth-Century Chinese Archaeology, Yale University Press; (June 10, 2004).
From the Publisher
Published in association with the Nelson Atkins Museum of Art.


About the Author
Xiaoneng Yang is curator of Chinese art at the Nelson Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, Missouri.


Book Description
This richly illustrated book is the first to introduce and discuss the most important archaeological discoveries in China during the entire twentieth century. The two-volume set draws on Chinese archaeological fieldwork to address cross-disciplinary topics in archaeology, art history, epigraphy, history, and religion.

Chinese archaeology has provided materials that are prompting scholars to reconstruct or rewrite China’s history from the prehistoric period through the Imperial dynasties. New Perspectives on China’s Past is a compendium of this breakthrough research and the global scholarship that surrounds it. With some six hundred illustrations, glossary, index, and extensive bibliography, this work will be a standard reference on Chinese archaeology in the twentieth century.

Published in association with the Nelson Atkins Museum of Art
Twentieth Century China: A History in Documents (Pages from History), by R. Keith Schoppa, Oxford Univ Pr; (June 4, 2004).
The twentieth century was a time of great change in China--for its government, economy, culture, and everyday life. It was a period of revolutions, and Twentieth Century China chronicles these uprisings with the words and images of the participants.

Using a wide variety of primary sources, such as official reports and public statements, eyewitness and participant accounts, newspaper articles, political posters, cartoons, poetry, songs, and advertisements, R. Keith Schoppa paints a picture of a society undergoing dramatic changes, both political and social. Taken together, these documents tell a dramatic and often violent tale, alternately soaring with hope and plunging into deep despair, of a country undergoing a thorough transformation--a transformation that affects the world at large.

The manifesto delivered by Sun Yat-sen in 1905, for example, details his plan to oust the Manchus; an editorial in a student journal encourages the activities of the May Fourth Movement in 1919; a 1933 speech by Chiang Kai-shek condemns China's enemies, the Communists and the Japanese; and the lyrics of a Chinese rock star give voice to the student demonstrations at the end of the 1980s. This is the story of the people--leaders and followers--whose decisions propelled modern Chinese history in erratic directions.

R. Keith Schoppa is Professor and Doehler Chair in Asian History at Loyola College in Maryland. He is the author of several books including Chinese Elites and Political Change: Zhejiang Province in the Early Twentieth Century (Harvard, 1982), Xiang Lake--Nine Centuries of Chinese Life (Yale, 1989), Blood Road: The Mystery of Shen Dingyi in Revolutionary China (California, 1995), and The Columbia Guide to Modern Chinese History (Columbia, 2000).

Mao Meets The Oklahoma Cowboy: Patrick Hurley And The China Policy, 1944-45, by William Krones, Xlibris Corporation; (June 4, 2004).
Japan, China, and the Growth of the Asian International Economy, 1850-1949, by Kaoru Sugihara, Oxford University Press; (June 1, 2004).
Modern Asian economic history has often been written in terms of Western impact and Asia's response to it. This volume argues that the growth of intra-regional trade, migration, and capital and money flows was a crucial factor that determined the course of East Asian economic development.

Edited by Kaoru Sugihara, Professor of Economic History, Graduate School of Economics, Osaka University

China and the Manchus, by Herbert A. Giles, Kessinger Publishing; (June 2004) (平裝本)
Editorial Reviews
Excerpted from China and the Manchus [E-BOOK: MICROSOFT READER] by Herbert A. Giles. Copyright © 2001. Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved
The Manchus are descended from a branch of certain wild Tungusic nomads, who were known in the ninth century as the Nü-chêns, a name which has been said to mean "west of the sea." The cradle of their race lay at the base of the Ever-White Mountains, due north of Korea, and was fertilised by the head waters of the Yalu River.

In an illustrated Chinese work of the fourteenth century, of which the Cambridge University Library possesses the only known copy, we read that they reached this spot, originally the home of the Su-shên tribe, as fugitives from Korea; further, that careless of death and prizing valour only, they carried naked knives about their persons, never parting from them by day or night, and that they were as "poisonous" as wolves or tigers. They also tattooed their faces, and at marriage their mouths. By the close of the ninth century the Nü-chêns had become subject to the neighbouring Kitans, then under the rule of the vigorous Kitan chieftain, Opaochi, who, in 907, proclaimed himself Emperor of an independent kingdom with the dynastic title of Liao, said to mean "iron," and who at once entered upon that long course of aggression against China and encroachment upon her territory which was to result in the practical division of the empire between the two powers, with the Yellow River as! boundary, K'ai-fêng as the Chinese capital, and Peking, now for the first time raised to the status of a metropolis, as the Kitan capital. Hitherto, the Kitans had recognised China as their suzerain; they are first mentioned in Chinese history in A.D. 468, when they sent ambassadors to court, with tribute.

Turning now to China, the famous House of Sung, the early years of which were so full of promise of national prosperity, and which is deservedly associated with one of the two most brilliant periods in Chinese literature, was founded in 960. Korea was then forced, in order to protect herself from the encroachments of China, to accept the hated supremacy of the Kitans; but being promptly called upon to surrender large tracts of territory, she suddenly entered into an alliance with the Nü-chêns, who were also ready to revolt, and who sent an army to the assistance of their new friends. The Nü-chên and Korean armies, acting in concert, inflicted a severe defeat on the Kitans, and from this victory may be dated the beginning of the Nü-chên power. China had indeed already sent an embassy to the Nü-chêns, suggesting an alliance and also a combination with Korea, by which means the aggression of the Kitans might easily be checked; but during the eleventh century Korea became alienated from the Nü-chêns, and even went so far as to advise China to join with the Kitans in crushing the Nü-chêns. China, no doubt, would have been glad to get rid of both these troublesome neighbours, especially the Kitans, who were gradually filching territory from the empire, and driving the Chinese out of the southern portion of the province of Chihli.

For a long period China weakly allowed herself to be blackmailed by the Kitans, who, in return for a large money subsidy and valuable supplies of silk, forwarded a quite insignificant amount of local produce, which was called "tribute" by the Chinese court.

Early in the twelfth century, the Kitan monarch paid a visit to the Sungari River, for the purpose of fishing, and was duly received by the chiefs of the Nü-chên tribes in that district. On this occasion the Kitan Emperor, who had taken perhaps more liquor than was good for him, ordered the younger men of the company to get up and dance before him. This command was ignored by the son of one of the chiefs, named Akutêng (sometimes, but wrongly, written Akuta), and it was suggested to the Emperor that he should devise means for putting out of the way so uncompromising a spirit. No notice, however, was taken of the affair at the moment; and that night Akutêng, with a band of followers, disappeared from the scene. Making his way eastward, across the Sungari, he started a movement which may be said to have culminated five hundred years later in the conquest of China by the Manchus. --This text refers to the Digital edition.

Download Description
A scholarly, detailed, always readable history of the Manchu conquest and 300 hundred year rule of China. --This text refers to the
Digital edition.

 A Business in Risk : Jardine Matheson and the Hong Kong Trading Industry, by Carol Matheson Connell, Praeger Publishers; (May 30, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
Synopsis
A strategy consultant for IBM and a descendant of one of the founders of Jardine Matheson and Company, Connell tells the story of that company. It was formally constituted in 1832, she says, but had evolved from an unbroken line of partnerships and inherited extensive trading relationships. 


Book Description
Jardine Matheson & Company is perhaps best known through James Clavell's Taipan. The firm played an important role in the founding of Hong Kong, but its growth in the 20th century, through acquisition and divestiture, has never been adequately explored until now. This is not only the first study of Jardine Matheson to systematically uncover the industrial logic of its growth strategy; it is also among the first studies of the Hong Kong trading industry as an adaptive "ecosystem" based on trade, equity, and debt relationships that reduced business risk. Understanding the experience of Jardine Matheson will prove valuable to anyone who is eager to learn the lessons of adaptation and survival that marked not only the first period of globalization, but its current incarnation as well.

Himalayan Hermitess: The Life of a Tibetan Buddhist Nun, by Kurtis R. Schaeffer, Oxford University Press; (May 30, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
Synopsis
Orgyan Chokyi (1675-1729) spent her life in Dolpo, the highest inhabited region of the Nepal Himalayas. Illiterate and expressly forbidden by her master to write her own life story, Orgyan Chokyi received divine inspiration to compose one of the most forthright and engaging spiritual autobiographies of the Tibetan literary tradition.
A Newspaper for China? : Power, Identity, and Change in Shanghai's News Media, 1872-1912 (Harvard East Asian Monographs), by Barbara Mittler, Harvard University Press; (May 30, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
Synopsis
In 1872 in the treaty port of Shanghai, British merchant Ernest Major founded one of the longest-lived and most successful of modern Chinese-language newspapers, the "Shenbao". His publication quickly became a leading newspaper in China and won praise as a "department store of news", a "forum for intellectual discussion and moral challenge" and an "independent mouthpiece of the public voice". Located in the International Settlement of Shanghai, it was free of government regulation. Paradoxically, in a country where the government monopolized the public sphere, it became one of the world's most independent newspapers. As a private venture, the Shenbao was free of the ideologies that constrained missionary papers published in China during the nineteenth century. But it also lacked the subsidies that allowed these papers to survive without a large readership. As a purely commercial venture, the foreign-managed "Shenbao" depended on the acceptance of educated Chinese, who would write for it, read it and buy it. This book sets out to analyze how the managers of the "Shenbao" made their alien product acceptable to Chinese readers and how foreign-style newspapers became alternative modes of communication acknowledged as a powerful part of the Chinese public sphere within a few years. In short, it describes how the foreign "Shenbao" became a "newspaper for China".
A Modern History of Hong Kong, by Steve Tsang, I.B. Tauris; (May 28, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Steve Tsang is Louis Cha Senior Research Fellow at St. Antony's College, Oxford University. He is the author of Hong Kong: An Appointment with China (I.B.Tauris, 1997).


Book Description
From a little-known fishing community at the periphery of China, Hong Kong developed into one of the world's most spectacular and cosmopolitan cities after a century and a half of British imperial rule. The history of Hong Kong, from its occupation by the British in 1841 to its return to Chinese sovereignty in 1997, is a fascinating story of East meeting West. This book addresses the changing relations between the local Chinese and expatriate communities in 156 years of British rule, and the emergence of a local identity. It explains the importance of China as a factor in its development and the origins of the so-called "1997 problems," thus analyzing the underlying reasons for the rise of a liberal society committed to the rule of law without democracy.
Opium, Soldiers and Evangelicals, by Harry G. Gelber, Palgrave Macmillan; (May 28, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Harry G. Gelber is a Professor of History and Political Science and Visiting Research Fellow, Asian Research Centre, London School of Economics and Political Economy.


Book Description
This book questions the universal belief that England's 1840-42 war with China was an "Opium War." What really worried London was "insults to the crown," the claim of a dilapidated and corrupt China to be superior to everyone, threats to British men and women and seizure of British property, plus the wish to expand and free trade everywhere. It was only much later that general Chinese resentment and Evangelical opinion at home - and in America - persuaded everyone that Britain had indeed been wicked and fought for opium.
Bitter Revolution: China's Struggle With the Modern World, by Rana Mitter, Oxford University Press; (May 1, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
From Publishers Weekly
This is a fascinating look at a pivotal time in the formation of the culture of modern China. The "Bitter Revolution" of the title is not the Communist Revolution of 1949 or the Cultural Revolution of the 1960s, but the revolution of ideas that climaxed in the mass anti-imperialist protests of May 4, 1919. Known as the May Fourth Movement, these student-led protests engendered tumultuous cultural eddies that disturbed all aspects of Chinese life. Mitter's focus on this underappreciated fulcrum of modern Chinese history is refreshing. Chinese Communist historiography has mythologized the May Fourth Movement as the youthful harbinger of the 1949 revolution. Mitter goes beyond such teleological myths to recapture the often desperate and heady atmosphere of the "New Culture Movement," which paralleled the political tumult. She reveals antecedents to later events, including developments as disparate as the Cultural Revolution and the recent decades of economic and cultural liberalization. Especially interesting were new attitudes toward gender relations, sexuality, marriage and family. In many ways, the individualism and experimentation of that era have more in common with contemporary China than the intervening decades of wartime and Communist collectivism and conformity—a compelling reason why this history of early 20th-century China is so relevant today. What is most intriguing about Mitter's account is not what was lost in the dark decades that followed, but how much endured.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Book Description
China today is poised to play a key role on the world stage, but in the early twentieth century the situation was very different. In this powerful new look at modern China, Rana Mitter goes back to a pivotal moment in Chinese history to uncover the origins of the painful transition from pre-modern to modern world. Mitter identifies May 4, 1919, as the defining moment of China's twentieth-century history. On that day, outrage over the Paris peace conference triggered a vast student protest that led in turn to 'the May Fourth Movement.' Just seven years before, the 2,000-year-old imperial system had collapsed. Now a new group of urban, modernizing thinkers began to reject Confucianism and traditional culture in general as hindrances in the fight against imperialism, warlordism, and the oppression of women and the poor. Forward-looking, individualistic, embracing youth, this 'New Culture movement' made a lasting impact on the critical decades that followed: the 1940s, with the war against Japan and the civil war between the Nationalist Party and the Communists; the 1960s, with the bizarre, seemingly anarchic world of Mao Zedong's Cultural Revolution; and the 1980s, with the rise of a semi-market economy against the backdrop of continued single-party rule and growing inequality. Throughout each of these dramatically different eras, the May 4 themes persisted, from the insanity of the Cultural Revolution to the recent romance with space-age technology. China, Mitter concludes, still seems to be in search of a new narrative about what the country is, and what it should become. And May 4 remains a touchstone in that search.
Chinese Communists and the West: A Concise Biographical Handbook of Chinese Communism and Western Supporters, by Thomas Kampen, University of Hawaii Press; (May 1, 2004)
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Thomas Kampen teaches at the University of Heidelberg, Germany. He is the author of Mao Zedong, Zhou Enlai and the Evolution of the Chinese Communist Party.


Book Description
The 200 individuals in this biographical dictionary provided the crucial link between revolutionary movements in China, Europe, and America during the first half of the 20th century. It covers Chinese Communists who went to the West and western (European and American) communists and leftists who went to China. The book also includes many Chinese who played important roles in the international Communist movement. This is an essential reference for students, libraries, and researchers dealing with the history of modern China or the international Communist movement. --This text refers to the
Paperback edition.
Mao's Road to Power: The New Stage (August 1937-1938) (Mao's Road to Power, 6), by Stuart R. Schram, East Gate Book; (May 1, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
Synopsis
By 1936, after a decade of Civil War and even before the Xi'an Incident, Mao Zedong had begun talking about a "New Stage" of cooperation between the Guomindang and the Communist Party. With the establishment of a framework for cooperation between the two parties, and as Japan began its brutal war against China, Mao began to develop this theme more systematically in both the political and military spheres. This volume documents the evolution of Mao's thinking in this area that found its culmination in his long report to the Sixth Enlarged Plenum of the Central Committee in October, 1938, explicitly entitled "On the New Stage" and presented here in its entirety. It was also during this period that Mao delivered a course of lectures on dialectical materialism after reading and annotating a number of works on Marxist theory by Soviet and Chinese authors. These lectures, from which "On Practice" and "On Contradiction" were later extracted, are also translated here in their entirety.
Mapping Meanings: The Field of New Learning in Late Qing China (Sinica Leidensia), by Michael Lackner, Natascha Vittinghoff, Brill Academic Pub; (May 1, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Natascha Vittinghoff, Ph.D. (1998) in Sinology, Heidelberg University, is Junior Professor of Sinology at Frankfurt University. She has published extensively on modern Chinese drama, literature and media and Late Qing social history including Die Anfänge des Journalismus in China, 1860-1911, (2002).

Michael Lackner, Ph.D. (1985), University of Munich, is Chair of Chinese Studies at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg.

Book Description
Mapping Meanings is essentially a broad-ranged introduction to China’s intellectual entry into the family of nations. Written by a fine selection of experts, it guides the reader into the terrain of China's (late Qing) encounter with Western knowledge and modern sciences, and at the same time connects convincingly to the broader question of the mobility of knowledge. The late Qing literati's pursue of New Learning was a transnational practice inseparable from the local context. Mapping Meanings therefore attempts to highlight what the encountered global knowledge could have meant to specific social actors in the specific historical situation. Subjects included are the transformation of the examination system, the establishment of academic disciplines, and new social actors and questions of new terminologies.

Re-Understanding Japan: Chinese Perspectives, 1895-1945 (Asian Interactions and Comparisons), by Lu YanUniversity of Hawaii Press; (May 1, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Lu Yan is associate professor of history at the University of New Hampshire. 

Book Description
To many Chinese, the rise and expansion of Japanese power during the years between the two Sino-Japanese wars (1895-1945) presented a paradox: With its successful modernization, Japan became a model to be emulated; yet as the country's imperial ambitions on the continent grew, it posed an ever-increasing threat. Drawing on an extraordinary array of source materials, Lu Yan shows that this attraction to and apprehension of Japan prompted the Chinese to engage in a variety of long-term relationships with the Japanese. 
Re-understanding Japan examines transnational and transcultural interactions between China and Japan during those five dramatic and tragic decades at the intimate level of personal lives and behavior. At the center of Lu's study are four diverse yet significant case studies: military strategist Jiang Baili, literary critic and essayist Zhou Zuoren, Guomindang leader Dai Jitao, and romantic poet turned Communist Guo Moruo. In their public and private lives, these influential Chinese formed lasting ties with Japan and the Japanese. While their writings reached the Chinese public through the print mass media and served to enhance popular understanding of Japan and its culture, their activities in political, cultural, and diplomatic affairs paralleled significant turns in Sino-Japanese relations. 

Based on archival documents, personal memoirs, correspondence, interviews, and contemporary literary works, Re-understanding Japan delineates diverse approaches in Chinese efforts to engage Japan in China's modern reforms. Although they recognized the importance of Japan, these Chinese nevertheless could not agree on which Japanese model to emulate or what approach to take to deal with the Japanese threat. Regardless of whether their experiments succeeded or failed, however, the thoughts and actions of these men, as recounted in this skillfully layered analysis, illustrate the different paths taken by Chinese to rediscover and re-understand Japan in modern times.
South China in the Sixteenth Century, by C. R. Boxer, Orchid Press; 2nd edition (May 1, 2004).
In this volume, first published in 1953 and long out of print and unavailable, the eminent linguist and historian, C. R. Boxer, translates, edits and presents in highly readable form three narratives of South China as it appeared to Portuguese and Spanish visitors in the years 1550-1575. Provides considerable detail of the people, culture and conditions in Ming China from a Western perspective.
"...three works of outstanding importance and of the greatest interest both to sinologists and to all concerned with the earliest impact of China on the modern West". (O.B. van der Sprenkel)
Superfluous Things: Material Culture and Social Status in Early Modern China, by Craig Clunas, University of Hawaii Press; (May 1, 2004).(平裝本)
"The sense of completeness that characterizes Clunas' writing has something to do with the self-assured patter of his prose, with its intense and unwavering focus on the subject before him. But it has more to do with his reach, his willingness to cross the disciplinary boundaries of his field.... An eye-opening pleasure to read." --Ming Studies

"Bold and insightful.... Clunas establishes the importance of material consumption as an index of much larger historical processes. Students of early modern Europe as well as China will find [his] arguments both pertinent and compelling." --American Historical Review

"One of those rare books whose every chapter makes you think, often about features of Chinese society that we have too long taken for granted.... Inspiring, even entertaining." --Journal of Asian Studies

This outstanding and original book, presented here with a new preface, examines the history of material culture in early modern China. Craig Clunas analyzes "superfluous things"--the paintings, calligraphy, bronzes, ceramics, carved jade, and other objects owned by the elites of Ming China--and describes contemporary attitudes to them. He informs his discussions with reference to both socio-cultural theory and current debates on eighteenth-century England concerning luxury, conspicuous consumption, and the growth of the consumer society.

To Become a God : Cosmology, Sacrifice, and Self-Divinization in Early China (Harvard-Yenching Institute Monograph Series), by Michael J. Puett, Harvard University Press; (May 1, 2004).(平裝本)
Evidence from Shang oracle bones to memorials submitted to Western Han emperors attests to a long-lasting debate in early China over the proper relationship between humans and gods. One pole of the debate saw the human and divine realms as separate and agonistic and encouraged divination to determine the will of the gods and sacrifices to appease and influence them. The opposite pole saw the two realms as related and claimed that humans could achieve divinity and thus control the cosmos. This wide-ranging book reconstructs this debate and places within their contemporary contexts the rival claims concerning the nature of the cosmos and the spirits, the proper demarcation between the human and the divine realms, and the types of power that humans and spirits can exercise. It is often claimed that the worldview of early China was unproblematically monistic and that hence China had avoided the tensions between gods and humans found in the West. By treating the issues of cosmology, sacrifice, and self-divinization in a historical and comparative framework that attends to the contemporary significance of specific arguments, Michael J. Puett shows that the basic cosmological assumptions of ancient China were the subject of far more debate than is generally thought.
China, by Demetrius Charles Boulger, Kessinger Publishing Company; (May 2004).(珍稀書本重印)
General Chiang Pai-Li and His Military Thought, by Jan-Chih Wang, Authorhouse; (May 2004).

From the Opium War in 1839 to the Japanese invasion in 1937, China went through the darkest period of more then one hundred years. The country and its people were struggling for survival. The ideas of one man gave them great inspiration and hope, and his principles of strategy helped the nation to endure eight years to win the war. But he and his principles on national defense were forgotten after the war ended General Chiang Pai-li (1882-1938) started his education with the ancient Thirteen Classics, had less than one year in college for economics, graduated from the Japanese Military Academy in 1905, and spent four years in the German Army for advanced training. He was not merely a soldier, but a rounded man: an eloquent speaker, a penetrating writer, diplomat, educator, poet, philosopher, and patriot. Above all, he was a humanist: an admirer of Kant and Goethe, a student of Sun Tzu, Lao Tzu, Buddhism, Christianity, and essentially a Confucius disciple who always maintains an "infant's heart" and an insatiable urge for learning. The utmost concern of General Chiang was preparation for war against Japanese aggression. Before the war, he advised the nation to delay it from happening as long as possible; once the war started, he firmly admonished "Never negotiate with them". His military thought was developed, from his study and interpretation of the social and economic life of mankind: "Nations whose living and fighting conditions are integrated will be strong; those separated will be weak; when those conditions opposing each other, they will perish." The pillars in his national defense programs are the Civilian Arri1y System and the "Integrated Education of the Civilian and Military". He professed that national defense war is a total war, and he was against the idea of absolutism in war.

Chiang Pal-Ii was very much aware of the fact that all the themes in his doctrines, such as organization, discipline, and the "Doctrines of Integration" can be manipulated to form a totalitarian state. To prevent it from happening, Chiang followed the line of the constitutionalists and emphasized the parallel development of man's duty to the state, and the rights due him from the state. He emphasized that a sound political system is the immediate supervisor. Above that, he fused from the great cultures of the World his higher principles for all peoples: "Life is the beginning of love, which makes man enjoy his life to the fullest. Death is the ultimate of love, which guides man in putting his death to good purposes." And from Confucius teachings of human relations, harmony, and responsibilities, he extended the moral behavior of man into international morality that a nation must be able to live, to let and to help others live. Dr. Wang has done a scholarly work by examining the profound influence of ancient Chinese teachings as well as that from the West, and assessed the contributions and handicaps bequeathed upon Chiang Pai-li. His insight and his thorough understanding of General Chiang's writings enabled him to construct a perfect structure of the thought which is still timely and lasting.

Herbert A. Giles and China, by Herbert A. Giles, Joshua A. Fogel (Introduction), Kurodahan Press; (May 2004).
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Herbert A. Giles (1845-1935)

Herbert Allen Giles was born in England, and was the son of an Oxford University-trained scholar-minister. He served in the Chinese consular service from 1867 to 1893, then retired to a position at Cambridge University, where he taught until 1932. He was a pioneer of modern sinology, and the author of a great many books, both scholarly and popular. His name is best remembered in connection with the Wade-Giles system of romanizing the Chinese language, which he developed in co-operation with Thomas F. Wade. Giles was also the author of a Chinese Biographical Dictionary (1898) and Chinese-English Dictionary (1912): both are still valuable reference works for scholars and students of Chinese language and culture.

Book Description
Modern sinology -- the study of things Chinese --may trace its roots back centuries to Marco Polo, Byzantium and even Imperial Rome, but to a great extent it was built on foundations laid and extended by Herbert Giles, a consul for the United Kingdom in China and later a professor at Cambridge University. Two of his most important works, Chinese Sketches (1876) and The Civilization of China (1911), are now available in a single volume, revealing once again his piercing observations and a glimpse of a very different China.

The Legacy of Sun Yatsen: A History of the Chinese Revolution, by Gustav Amann, Frederick Philip Grove (Translator), Kessinger Publishing; (May 2004).(珍稀書本重印)
1929. With prefaces by Karl Haushofer and Engelbert Krebs. A study of Sun Yatsen who is considered the founding father of modern China, both in the People's Republic and in the Republic of China (or Taiwan). Contents: A Word of Criticism; The Pearl: By Way of Introduction; The Downfall of the Manchu Dynasty; The Bequest of Sun Yatsen; The Constitution of the Nationalist Government; Struggles; The March to the Yang-Tze-Kiang; and The Work of the Militarists.
Tibet and Her Neighbours, by Alex McKay (Editor), et al, Thames & Hudson; (May 2004).
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Alex McKay is a research fellow at the Wellcome Trust Centre for the Study of the History of Medicine at University College, London. He is the author of Tibet and the British Raj: The Frontier Cadre 1904-1947, and numerous articles on Indo-Tibetan history and culture.


Book Description
A history of Tibet and its diplomatic relations since the country's emergence as a unified state in the seventh century.

Tibet has developed a unique culture in harmony with life in the harsh environment of the "Roof of the World" —the Tibetan plateau and the Himalayan mountain chain. While geographical isolation from European eyes led to its being seen by Westerners as a mysterious and otherworldly place, Tibet historically enjoyed a distinct identity among the community of nations in South and Central Asia.

Here, leading historians examine aspects of Tibet's relations with its neighboring states through the centuries up to the present day, and demonstrate the complex interplay of relationships between Tibet and the outside world. Nepal, Bhutan, Mongolia, British India, Russia, Nazi Germany, China, and the United States have all become involved in diplomatic encounters with the Tibetan state, and there are detailed accounts of tsarist generals, Nazi scientists, American spies, and British and Chinese colonialists, all of whom sought to influence or control the Tibetans.

Tibet is now occupied by the Communist Chinese, and many of its former rulers are in exile in India and the West. This work is an important reminder of the long history of the Tibetan peoples and their continuing struggle for self-determination. 30 illustrations.

Buddhist Records Of The Western World: Translated From The Chinese Of Hiuen Tsiang, Ad 629, by Samuel Beal, Coronet Books Inc; Reprint edition (April 30, 2004)(Reprint of 1884 Edition, London)
Among the various travelogues, Hiuen Tsiang's Si-yu-ki or Records of the Western World, is considered to be the most valuable sources book for the study of ancient Indian history. Si-yu-ki is not merely a travel-diary recording Hiuen Tsiang's visit to various places in India and the places en route, but is also an account of the conditions of India during the seventh century.

This journey was undertaken by Hiuen Tsiang primarily with a view to visiting the Buddhist places of pilgrimage and to seek answers to the questions agitating his mind. He was inspired in this by the recollection of similar journeys undertaken centuries ago by his predecessors, Fa-hien, Sung Yun and many others. Born at Loyang in the year 600, Hieun Tsiang set out on this journey to the regions west of China and to India at the age of twenty-nine from Chang'an in West China.

Traveling by the northern route which took him to Turfan, Kara Shahr, Lake Issyk Kul, Tashkent, Samarkind, Balkh and Bamiyan, he arrived in the Kingdom of Gandhara towards the end of the year 630. From there he proceeded to India and practically traversed the entire country going as far south as Kanchi and Nasik, Valabhi and Multan in the west. During his sojourn he spent nearly eight years, from 635 to 643, in Harsha's dominions and stayed for about fifteen months at Nalanda, learning the Yogachara doctrine which he afterwards enunciated in a book on his return to his country. Early in 645 he reached China, returning by the southern route passing through Kashgar, Yarkand, Khotan, and Lop-nor.

On his return to China, where he was received with great honor and bestowed the title Master of the Law, he took to the work of compiling and account of his travels. In the present volume, Samuel Beal has included, for the sake to completeness, Travels of Fa-hian or Fo-Kwo-ki. The mission of Sung-Yun and Hwei-Sang and the preface to the Si-yu-ki by Chang Yueh.
The Troublesome Legacy of Commissioner Lin : The Opium Trade and Opium Suppression in Fujian Province, 1820s to 1920s (Harvard East Asian Monographs), by Joyce A. Madancy, Harvard University Press; (April 30, 2004)
In 1908, a very public crusade against opium was in full swing throughout China, and the provincial capital and treaty port of Fuzhou was a central stage for the campaign. This, the most successful attempt undertaken by the Chinese state before 1949 to eliminate opium, came at a time when, according to many historians, China's central state was virtually powerless. This volume attempts to reconcile that apparent contradiction.

The remarkable, albeit temporary, success of the anti-opium campaign between 1906 and 1920 is as yet largely unexplained. How these results were achieved, how that progress was squandered, and why China's opium problem proved so tenacious are the questions that inspired this volume. The attack on this social problem was led by China's central and provincial authorities, aided by reformist elites, and seemingly supported by most Chinese. The anti-opium movement relied on the control and oversight provided by a multilayered state bureaucracy, the activism and support of unofficial elite-led reform groups, the broad nationalistic and humanitarian appeal of the campaign, and the cooperation of the British government. The extent to which the Chinese state was able to control the pace and direction of the anti-opium campaign and the evolving nature of the political space in which elite reformers publicized and enforced that campaign are the guiding themes of this analysis.

In the Shadow of the Rising Sun : Shanghai under Japanese Occupation (Cambridge Modern China Series), by Christian Henriot (Editor), et al, Cambridge University Press; (April 12, 2004)
Editorial Reviews

Synopsis
The authors of this volume consult newly available Chinese and Western archival materials to examine the Chinese War of Resistance against the Japanese in the Shanghai area. They argue that the war in China was a nationalistic endeavour carried out without an effective national leadership. Wartime Chinese activities in Shanghai drew upon social networks rather than ideological positions, and these activities cut across lines of military and political divisions. Instead of the stark contrast between heroic resistance and shameful collaboration, wartime experience in the city is more aptly summed up in terms of bloody struggles between those committed to normalcy in everyday life and those determined to bring about its disruption through terrorist violence and economic control. Capturing the last moments of European settlements in Shanghai under Japanese occupation, this is the first serious scholarly endeavour to examine the Sino-Japanese War from a regional as well as international perspective.



Book Description
Rejecting conventional demands, this book examines how ordinary men and women, Chinese as well as foreign, endured the Japanese military assault and occupation of Shanghai during the Chinese War of Resistance (1937-1945). Instead of presenting their stories in terms of heroic resistance versus shameful collaboration with the enemy, the volume reveals how the city's dwellers mobilized a variety of social networks to circumvent enemy strictures. They employed strategies that kept alive a culture and an economy that were vital to the survival of the brutalized population.
Architectural Encounters with Essence and Form in Modern China, by Peter G. Rowe, Seng Kuan, The MIT Press; (April 1, 2004)(Edition: Paperback)
Editorial Reviews
Synopsis
Built around snatches of discussion overheard in a Beijing design studio, this book explores attitudes toward architecture in China since the opening of the Treaty Ports in the 1840s. Central to the discussion are the concepts of ti and yong, or "essence" and "form," Chinese characters that are used to define the proper arrangement of what should be considered modern and essentially Chinese. Ti and yong have gone through various transformations - for example, from "Chinese learning for essential principles and Western learning for practical application" to "socialist essence and cultural form" and an almost complete reversal to "modern essence and Chinese form." The book considers such subjects as cultural developments in China in response to the forced opening to the West in the mid-nineteenth century, the return of overseas-educated Chinese architects, foreign influences on Chinese architecture, the controversy over the use of "big roofs" and other sinicizing aspects of Chinese architecture in the 1950s, the hard economic conditions of the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution - when architecture was almost abandoned - and the beginning of reform.


Book Description
A study of traditional and modernist attitudes toward architecture in China from the 1840s to the present.
Chinese Buddhism: Historical, Descriptive and Critical (Trubner's Oriental Series), by Joseph Edkins, International Specialized Book Services; (April 1, 2004)
The System of Taxation in China in the Tsing Dynasty, 1644-1911 (Studies in History, Economics, and Public Law, No. 143.), by Shao-Kwan Chen, Lawbook Exchange; (September 1, 2004) (Reprint)
China's imperial era ended with the collapse of the Tsing (Qing or Manchu) dynasty in 1911. Memorable for its cultural efflorescence, the dynasty was gradually undermined by political weakness, rebellion and Western imperialism. This study looks at the ways taxation was administered during this complicated and turbulent era. Chen outlines the structure of the imperial government, then looks at ways it taxed land, salt and commodities.
China's Golden Age: Everyday Life in the Tang Dynasty, by Charles D. Benn, Oxford University Press, Oxford University Press; (August 1, 2004)
Book Description
The Tang Dynasty (618-907), traditionally regarded as the golden age of China, was a time of patricians and intellectuals, Buddhist monks and Taoist priests, poetry and music, song and dance. In China's Golden Age: Everyday Life in the Tang Dynasty, Charles Benn paints a vivid picture of the lifestyle behind the grandeur of the Tang culture. All aspects of day-to-day life are presented, including crime,entertainment, fashion, marriage, food, hygiene, dwellings, and transportation. Attend an ancient feast to celebrate an imperial birthday, where ale was served in elaborate pitchers before a meal of fourteen hors d'oeuvres and twenty-three courses. Learn which colors concubines used for their eye makeup and beauty marks, and what jealous wives did to discourage such enhancement. See the similarities between today's pubs and the Tang alehouses, where women were hired to dance and sing to encourage patrons to stay longer and spend more money. Decide for yourself why Yangzhou, a city on the Grand Canal close to the Yangtze River, was considered one of the greatest cities in the Tang Dynasty. Benn translates and paraphrases his classical Chinese sources from the Tang era with fresh and polished prose. He also includes his own illustrations of everything from tools and hairstyles to musical instruments and courtyard dwellings. A history of the rise and fall of the dynasty is presented, as is a look at the societal structure of the aristocracy, bureaucracy, eunuchs, clergy, peasants, artisans, merchants, and slaves. This thorough explanation provides fascinating insight into a culture and time that is often misunderstood by Westerners and brings alive both the everyday routine and the timeless splendor of this intellectually and artistically powerful epoch. Enjoy your journey in China's Golden Age, and come back to the present with a greater understanding of this amazing time.
The Decorative Arts of the China Trade: Paintings, Furnishings and Exotic Curiosities, by Carl L. Crossman, Antique Collectors' Club; Reprint edition (July 30, 2004)
Editorial Reviews
From Publishers Weekly
Western trade with China began with the Portuguese in the 16th century, followed by Spanish, Dutch, English, French, Swedish and Austrian vessels. The Americans entered the scene in 1784. To satisfy the Occidental taste for exotica, Chinese artists created paintings, furniture, wallpaper, silks, embroideries, fans, carvings, silverware and pewter specifically for the export market. Their superb work can be sampled in this nimble study featuring hundreds of color and black-and-white plates. Crossman opens this survey with a colorful account of Salem, Mass., captain Benjamin Shreve's 1819 voyage, shipwreck off South America and subsequent trading in Canton. By the 1860s, quality overall had declined and the distinctive features of Chinese export art were blurred. This volume updates the original 1972 edition.
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Leeting Footsteps: Tracing the Conception of Arithmetic and Algebra in Ancient China, by Lam Lay Yong, World Scientific Publishing Company; Revised edition (June 1, 2004)
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Lam Lay Yong is a retired professor of Mathematics at the National University of Singapore. Based on her extensive publications on the history of Chinese mathematics which include this book and A Critical Study of the Yang Hui Suan Fa, as well as numerous articles in international journals such as Historia Mathematica, Archive for History of Exact Sciences, Isis and Archives Internationales D¹Histore des Sciences, she was awarded the Kenneth O. May Medal by the International Commission on the History of Mathematics.

Ang Tian Se was Professor of Chinese Studies, University of Malaya, Malaysia, and Head of Chinese Studies at Edith Cowan University, Australia. He is now Professor of Chinese Studies at Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Malaysia.

Book Description
The Hindu–Arabic numeral system (1, 2, 3,...) is one of mankind’s greatest achievements and one of its most commonly used inventions. How did it originate? Those who have written about the numeral system have hypothesized that it originated in India; however, there is little evidence to support this claim.

This book provides considerable evidence to show that the Hindu–Arabic numeral system, despite its commonly accepted name, has its origins in the Chinese rod numeral system. This system was widely used in China from antiquity till the 16th century. It was used by officials, astronomers, traders and others to perform addition, subtraction, multiplication, division and other arithmetic operations, and also used by mathematicians to develop arithmetic and algebra. Based on this system, numerous mathematical treatises were written.

Sun Zi suanjing (The Mathematical Classic of Sun Zi), written around 400 AD, is the earliest existing work to have a description of the rod numerals and their operations. With this treatise as a central reference, the first part of the book discusses the development of arithmetic and the beginnings of algebra in ancient China and, on the basis of this knowledge, advances the thesis that the Hindu–Arabic numeral system has its origins in the rod numeral system. Part Two gives a complete translation of Sun Zi suanjing.

In this revised edition, Lam Lay Yong has included an edited text of her plenary lecture entitled "Ancient Chinese Mathematics and Its Influence on World Mathematics", which was delivered at the International Congress of Mathematicians, Beijing 2002, after she received the prestigious Kenneth O. May Medal conferred by the International Commission on the History of Mathematics. This should serve as a useful and easy-to-comprehend introduction to the book.

The Men Who Governed Han China: Companion to a Biographical Dictionary of the Qin, Former Han and Xin Periods (Handbuch Der Orientalistik. Vierte Abteilung, China, Vol. 17,), by Michael Loewe, Brill Academic Pub; (June 1, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Michael Loewe, Ph.D. (London 1963) was University Lecturer in Chinese Studies at Cambridge (1963-90). His publications draw on literary and archaeological evidence and concern institutional, textual and intellectual aspects of the history of early imperial China.


Book Description
How were prominent figures in the formative stages of China’s imperial government affected by changes in the theory and practice of government and its institutions? Calling on documentary evidence, some found only recently, Dr. Loewe examines local administration, the careers of officials, military organisation, the nobilities and kingdoms, the concepts of imperial sovereignty and the part played by the emperors. Special attention is paid to the anomalies in the historical records; tabulated lists of officials and other items summarise the evidence on which the chapters are based. Historical change and intellectual controversies are seen in the growth and decay of organs of administration, in the careers of individual men and women and the personal part that they played in shaping events.
Living in Imperial China (Exploring Cultural History), by Jann Einfeld, Greenhaven Press; (May 1, 2004).
整個書系的介紹

Greenhaven Press's Exploring Cultural History series provides students and general readers with the major highlights of life in human cultures from ancient times to the present. Each anthology focuses on a particular era and region and presents primary and secondary documents that examine the family, home life, food and drink, women, childhood and education, arts and leisure, literacy and literature, roads and means of communications, slavery, religious beliefs, and more. Primary sources allow original voices from a past culture to echo through the corridors of time to give these topics immediacy and authenticity. Essays by historians and other modern scholars specializing in the topic add overviews and objective factual information to enhance the eyewitness accounts. An annotated table of contents, chronology, and extensive bibliography add clarity and context. Each volume in Greenhaven Press's Exploring Cultural History series opens a unique window through which readers can gaze into a distant time and place and eavesdrop on life in a vanished culture.

該書簡介

The unique values, beliefs, and customs of contemporary Chinese culture have their roots in China's imperial past. For more than two thousand years, the great emperors ruled the hearts and minds of the Chinese people. In this anthology, modern scholars and ancient sages write about the way of life of the imperial Chinese, covering such topics as the wisdom of Confucius, the origins of Chinese medicine, and the antics of the eunuchs of the imperial palace.

Ancient Worlds, Modern Reflections: Philosophical Perspectives on Greek and Chinese Science and Culture
by G. E. R. Lloyd, Oxford University Press; (April 1, 2004)
Description

Geoffrey Lloyd's pioneering new book uses a study of ancient Greek and Chinese science and culture to throw light on fundamental problems, both intellectual and moral, that we still face today. The issues range from the debate about realism and relativism in philosophy of science to doubts concerning the universal applicability of the discourse of human rights. Lloyd provides compelling evidence that ancient civilizations have much to offer contemporary debates in many fields of study.

Contents/contributors

  • 1 Understanding Ancient Societies
  • 2 Science in Ancient Civilizations?
  • 3 Carving out Territories
  • 4 A Common Logic
  • 5 Searching for Truth
  • 6 The Questionability of Belief
  • 7 Styles of Inquiry and the Question of a Common Ontology
  • 8 The Use and Abuse of Classification
  • 9 For Example and Against
  • 10 Universities: their Histories and Responsibilities
  • 11 Human Nature and Human Rights
  • 12 A Critique of Democracy
  • Conclusion
  • Glossary of Chinese and Greek Terms
Art, Religion, and Politics in Medieval China: The Dunhuang Cave of the Zhai Family, Ning Qiang, University of Hawaii Press; (March 1, 2004)
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Ning Qiang teaches in the Department of the History of Art at the University of Michigan.


Book Description
The cave-temple complex popularly known as the Dunhuang caves is the world's largest extant repository of Tang Buddhist art. Among the best preserved of the Dunhuang caves is the Zhai Family Cave, built in 642. It is this remarkable cave-temple that forms the focus of Ning Qiang's cross-disciplinary exploration of the interrelationship of art, religion, and politics during the Tang. The author combines, in his careful examination of the paintings and sculptures found there, the historical study of pictures with the pictorial study of history. By employing this two-fold approach, he is able to refer to textual evidence in interpreting the formal features of the cave-temple paintings and to employ visual details to fill in the historical gaps inevitably left by text-oriented scholars. The result is a comprehensive analysis of the visual culture of the period and a vivid description of social life in medieval China.

The original Zhai Family Cave pictures were painted over in the tenth century and remained hidden until the early 1940s. Once exposed, the early artwork appeared fresh and colorful in comparison with other Tang paintings at Dunhuang. The relatively fine condition of the Zhai Family Cave is crucial to our understanding of the original pictorial program found there and offers a unique opportunity to investigate the visual details of the original paintings and sculptures in the cave. At the same time, the remaining traces of reconstruction and redecoration provide a new perspective on how, for over three centuries, a wealthy Chinese clan used its familial cave as a political showcase.

Art, Religion, and Politics in Medieval China: The Dunhuang Cave of the Zhai Family is an in-depth study of the meaning and function of an exemplary Tang memorial cave and an important contribution to studies of Chinese religion, politics, sociology, literature, and folklore as well as to Chinese art history.

 

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Ancient China and Its Enemies: The Rise of Nomadic Power in East Asian History, Nicola Di Cosmo / Paperback / Cambridge University Press / April 2004
Ancient China and Its Enemies: The Rise of Nomadic Power in East Asian History

From the Publisher Relations between Inner Asian nomads and Chinese are a continuous theme throughout Chinese history, reaching particularly dramatic dimensions with the Mongol (1279-1368) and Manchu (1644-1912) conquests. Nicola Di Cosmo's study is part of a wave of new, revisionist scholarship made possible by important recent archaeological findings in China, Mongolia, and Central Asia that can now be compared to the historical record. In Ancient China and Its Nomadic Enemies, Di Cosmo explores the origins of the cultural and political tensions along China's northern frontiers through the first millennium B.C. Di Cosmo places the rise of pastoral nomadism to the North of China within the context of a larger phenomenon rising from the steppes of Central Asia. In doing so, he analyzes the ethnic, cultural, and political frontiers between nomads and Chinese and considers the cultural perceptions of "others" within a historical context. Di Cosmo assesses the work of Ssu-ma Ch'ien, the "Grand Historian" who wrote the first narrative of the northern nomads in Chinese history, by scrutinizing his motives, methods, and interpretation. Ancient China and Its Nomadic Enemies's new interpretation of well-known historical events will intrigue ancient history scholars, China historians, and archaeologists. Nicola Di Cosmo is Lecturer of Chinese History at the University of Canterbury, in Christchurch, New Zealand. Until recently, he was Associate Professor of Chinese and Inner Asian History in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations at Harvard University. He has published articles in a number of academic journals and is the Book Review Editor for the Inner Asia section of the Journal of AsianStudies and Editor in Charge of the Inner Asian section of the Journal of East Asian Archaeology.

 

Gathering Darkness: The Coming of War to the Far East and the Pacific, 1921-1942, Haruo Tohmatsu / Hardcover / Scholarly Resources, Inc. / April 2004
Fruitful Sites: Garden Culture in Ming Dynasty China, Craig Clunas / Paperback / Reaktion Books / April 2004
Fruitful Sites: Garden Culture in Ming Dynasty China

From the Publisher Gardens are sites that can be at one and the same time admired works of art and valuable pieces of real estate. As the first account in English to be wholly based on contemporary Chinese sources, this innovative, beautifully illustrated book grounds the practices of garden-making in Ming Dynasty China (1368-1644) firmly in the social and cultural history of the day. Who owned gardens? Who visited them? How were they represented in words, in paintings, and in visual culture generally, and what meanings did these representations hold at different levels of Chinese society? How did the discourse of gardens intersect with other discourses such as those of aesthetics, agronomy, geomancy, and botany? By examining the gardens of the city of Suzhou from a number of different angles, Craig Clunas provides a rich picture of a complex cultural phenomenon, one that was of crucial importance to the self-fashioning of the Ming elite. Drawing on a wide range of recent work in cultural theory, the author provides for the first time a historical and materialist account of Chinese garden culture, and replaces broad generalizations and orientalist fantasy with a convincing picture of the garden's role in social life.

 

Culture and Conquest in Mongol Eurasia, Thomas T. Allsen / Paperback / Cambridge University Press / March 2004
From the Publisher 
In the thirteenth century the Mongols created a vast transcontinental empire that functioned as a cultural "clearing house" for the Old World. Under Mongol auspices various commodities, ideologies, and technologies were disseminated and displayed across Eurasia. The focus of this path-breaking study is the extensive exchanges between Iran and China. The Mongol rulers of these two ancient civilizations "shared" the cultural resources of their realms with one another. The result was lively traffic in specialist personnel and scholarly literature between East and West. These exchanges ranged from cartography to printing, and from agriculture to astronomy. Unexpectedly, the principal conduit of this transmission was an obscure Mongol tribesman, Bolad Aqa, who first served Chinggisid rulers of China and was then posted to Iran where he entered into a close and productive collaboration with the famed Persian statesman and historian. Rashid al-Din. The conclusion of the work examines why the Mongols made such heavy use of sedentary scholars and specialists in the elaboration of their court culture and why they initiated so many exchanges across Eurasia. The book is informative and erudite. It crosses new scholarly boundaries in its analysis of communication and culture in the Mongol Empire and promises to become a classic in the field. 
Contract and Property in Early Modern China: Rational Choice in Political Science, Madeleine Zelin (Editor) / Hardcover / Stanford University Press / March 2004
Providing a new perspective on economic and legal institutions, particularly on contract and property, in Qing and Republican history, the papers in this volume provide case studies to explicate how these institutions worked, while situating them firmly in their broader social context.
A Study of Chinese Alchemy, by Obed Simon Johnson, Martino Pub; (May 2004).
Editorial Reviews
Book Description
This volume contains an investigation concerning the origin and development of Chinese alchemy, wherein evidence is submitted for a probable connection between the alchemy of China and that of medieval Europe.
The Sinister Way : The Divine and the Demonic in Chinese Religious Culture, by Richard von Glahn (Author),University of California Press; (April 15, 2004).
Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover
"A fascinating story of the origins and development of the Wutong cult and the demonic in Chinese religion. From the Shang Dynasty down to late imperial times, Von Glahn lays before us an engaging wealth of knowledge and never-before presented data."-Stephen R. Bokenkamp, Indiana University, author of Early Daoist Scriptures "No other writer has explored the place of the sinister in Chinese religion in such a thoughtful and nuanced way. An excellent, gracefully written study covering major themes of the Song through Ming periods."-Patricia Ebrey, author of The Inner Quarters: Marriage and the Lives of Chinese Women in the Sung Period


About the Author
Richard von Glahn is Professor of History at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is the coeditor of The Song-Yuan-Ming Transition in Chinese History (2003) and the author of Fountain of Fortune: Money and Monetary Policy in China, 1000-1700 (California, 1996) and The Country of Streams and Grottoes: Expansion, Settlement, and the Civilizing of the Sichuan Frontier in Song Times (1987).


Book Description
The most striking feature of Wutong, the preeminent God of Wealth in late imperial China, was the deity's diabolical character. Wutong was perceived not as a heroic figure or paragon of noble qualities but rather as an embodiment of humanity's basest vices, greed and lust, a maleficent demon who preyed on the weak and vulnerable. In The Sinister Way, Richard von Glahn examines the emergence and evolution of the Wutong cult within the larger framework of the historical development of Chinese popular or vernacular religion-as opposed to institutional religions such as Buddhism or Daoism. Von Glahn's study, spanning three millennia, gives due recognition to the morally ambivalent and demonic aspects of divine power within the common Chinese religious culture. Illustrations: 37 b/w photographs, 4 maps, 6 tables

Ambition and Identity: Chinese Merchant Elites in Colonial Manila, 1880-1916, by Andrew R. Wilson, University of Hawaii Press; (April 2004).
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Andrew R. Wilson is associate professor of strategy at the U.S. Naval War College, where he lectures on military history and strategic theory.


Book Description
What binds overseas Chinese communities together? Traditionally scholars have stressed the interplay of external factors (discrimination, local hostility) and internal forces (shared language, native-place ties, family) to account for the cohesion and "Chineseness" of these overseas groups. Andrew Wilson challenges this Manichean explanation of identity by introducing a third factor: the ambitions of the Chinese merchant elite, which played an equal, if not greater, role in the formation of ethnic identity among the Chinese in colonial Manila.

Drawing on Chinese, Spanish, and American sources and applying a broad range of historiographical approaches, this volume dissects the structures of authority and identity within Manila's Chinese community over a period of dramatic socioeconomic change and political upheaval. It reveals the ways in which wealthy Chinese merchants dealt in not only goods and services, but also political influence and the movement of human talent from China to the Philippines. Their influence and status extended across the physical and political divide between China and the Philippines, from the villages of southern China to the streets of Manila, making them a truly transnational elite. Control of community institutions and especially migration networks accounts for the cohesiveness of Manila's Chinese enclave, argues Wilson, and the most successful members of the elite self-consciously chose to identify themselves and their proteges as Chinese.

Ambition and Identity forces us to reexamine the processes of identity formation in the modern era. Manila's Chinese elite manipulated the aspirations and prejudices of colonial rulers and the desires of China's government to satisfy their own ambitions and further the security and prosperity of those under their leadership. Rather than having institutions and ethnic distinctions imposed on them by the colonial regime or by Beijing, or simply replicating strategies from their native-places, they demonstrated a subtle hand in constructing the identities that largely defined what it was to be "Chinese" in colonial Manila.

China, the Portuguese, and the Nanyang: Oceans and Routes, Regions and Trades (C. 1000-1600 (Variorum Collected Studies Series, 777), by Roderich Ptak, Ashgate Publishing; (April 2004)
The Class of 1761: Examinations, State, and Elites in Eighteenth-Century China, by Iona D. Man-Cheong, Stanford Univ Pr; (April 2004).
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Iona D. Man-Cheong is Associate Professor of History at the State University of New York at Stony Brook.


Book Description
"The Class of 1761" reveals the workings of China's imperial examination system from the unique perspective of a single graduating class. The author follows the students' struggles in negotiating the examination system along with bureaucratic intrigue and intellectual conflict, as well as their careers across the Empire—to the battlefields of imperial expansion in Annam and Tibet, the archives where the glories of the empire were compiled, and back to the chambers where they in turn became examiners for the next generation of aspirants.

The book explores the rigors and flexibilities of the examination system as it disciplined men for political life and shows how the system legitimated both the Manchu throne and the majority non-Manchu elite. In the system's intricately articulated networks, we discern the stability of the Qing empire and the fault lines that would grow to destabilize it.

The Communist Takeover of Hangzhou: The Transformation of City and Cadre, 1949-1954 (Study of the Weatherhead East Asian Institute), by James Zheng Gao, University of Hawaii Press; (April 2004).
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
James Gao is assistant professor at the University of Maryland at College Park.


Book Description
Existing literature on the Chinese Revolution takes into account the influence of peasant society on Mao's ideas and policies but rarely discusses a reverse effect of comparable significance: namely, how peasant cadres were affected by the urban environment into which they moved. In this detailed examination of the cultural dimension of regime change in the early years of the Revolution, James Gao looks at how rural-based cadres changed and were changed by the urban culture that they were sent to dominate. He investigates how Communist cadres at the middle and lower levels left their familiar rural environment to take over the city of Hangzhou and how they consolidated political control, established economic stability, developed institutional reforms, and created political rituals to transform the urban culture. His book analyzes the interplay between revolutionary and nonrevolutionary culture with respect to the varying degrees with which they resisted and adap! ted to each other. It reveals the essential role of cultural identity in legitimizing the new regime and keeping its revolutionary ideal alive.

Based on extensive research in regional and local archives in Zhejiang province and the municipality of Hangzhou, Gao incorporates fresh material from numerous personal interviews he conducted over the past decade. The book probes details and local nuances in the broader perspective of national revolution, thus offering a new interpretation of the Chinese pattern of post-revolutionary society. The Communist Takeover of Hangzhou will find an appreciative audience among both China specialists and general readers who want an accessible and up-to-date analysis of contemporary Chinese culture and politics.

 

The Cult of Happiness: Nianhua, Art, and History in Rural North China, by James A. Flath, University of Washington Press; (April 2004).
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
James A. Flath is professor of history at University of Western Ontario.


Book Description
This interdisciplinary study brings history and art together in a definitive discussion of the Chinese woodblock print form of nianhua (literally "New Year pictures") and an extraordinary account of the cultural life of rural North China during the late nineteenth to mid-twentieth centuries.

Beginning with an overview of nianhua production, James Flath considers the relationship of the prints to the social, cultural, and political milieu of North China from the late-Qing dyansty to the early 1950s. Using nianhua as historical documents, he reconstructs popular conceptions of domesticity, morality, gender, society, and modernity. Finally, he examines how communist authorities transformed the nianhua genre for use as a propaganda tool in the 1940s and early 1950s.
Diary of a Manchu Soldier in Seventeenth-Century China, by Nicola Di Cosmo, RoutledgeCurzon; 1st edition (April 2004)
Gutenberg in Shanghai: Chinese Print Capitalism, 1876-1937, by Christopher A. Reed, Univ of British Columbia; (April 2004).
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
A graduate of McGill University and of the universities of Glasgow and of California at Berkeley, Christopher A. Reed is a member of the History Department at The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.


Book Description
In the mid-1910s, what historians call the "Golden Age of Chinese Capitalism" began, accompanied by a technological transformation that included the drastic expansion of China’s "Gutenberg revolution." Gutenberg in Shanghai is a brilliant examination of this process. It finds the origins of that revolution in the country’s printing industries of the late imperial period and analyzes their subsequent development in the Republican era.

Under diverse social, political, and economic influences, this technological and cultural revolution saw woodblock printing replaced with Western mechanical processes. This book, which relies on documents previously unavailable to both Western and Chinese researchers, demonstrates how Western technology and evolving traditional values resulted in the birth of a unique form of print capitalism whose influence on Chinese culture was far-reaching and irreversible. Its conclusion contests scholarly arguments that view China’s technological development as slowed by culture, or that interpret Chinese modernity as mere cultural continuity.

A vital reevaluation of Chinese modernity, Gutenberg in Shanghai will appeal to scholars of Chinese history. Likewise, it will be enthusiastically received by specialists in cultural studies, political science, sociology, the history of the book, and the anthropology of science and technology.

 

Narcotic Culture: A History of Drugs in China, by Frank Dikotter, Lars Laamann, Zhou Xun, University of Chicago Press (Trd); (April 2004)
V.K. Wellington Koo and the Emergence of Modern China, by Stephen G. Craft, University Press of Kentucky,  (Hardcover -- April 2004).
Editorial Reviews

Qiang Zhai, Auburn University
"A welcome antidote to the general depersonalization of history."


About the Author
Stephen G. Craft is an assistant professor in the Humanities/Social Sciences Department at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, Florida, and has authored a number of articles concerning twentieth-century China.


Book Description
Alternately praised and resented both in his homeland and abroad, Chinese diplomat V.K. Wellington Koo played a major role in the development of modern China. Raised in Shanghai’s International Settlement in the last decade of the nineteenth century and educated at Columbia University, Koo’s early experiences with racism and western denigration of Chinese culture engendered in him a fierce nationalism. At the same time, however, he considered the democratic and modernized governments of the West as models upon which to build a modern China.

Koo’s position as a powerful westernized Chinese isolated him in many respects. At times distrusted by factions of his Chinese compatriots, who believed him willing to sacrifice Chinese heritage for western recognition and traditions, Koo was considered by foreign officials a "slippery" character because his American education rendered him too westernized to fit snugly into their stereotypes of the Chinese. Koo’s place at the crossroads of eastern and western cultures raised suspicions about his true ambitions for China; nonetheless, he was a crucial conduit between China and the leading nations with which it would have to cooperate in order to quash imperialist encroachment within its borders to emerge as a major power on the world stage.

V.K. Wellington Koo and the Emergence of Modern China is a compelling study of Koo and his role in resuscitating a declining empire. Stephen G. Craft chronicles Koo’s valuable public service as a diplomat, foreign minister, and prime minister throughout the turbulence that characterized China’s existence during much of the twentieth century. Craft analyzes Koo’s mixed success in the various ambitious projects he pursued. He helped form the League of Nations and the United Nations in hopes that collective security could become a reality and was disgusted when the Cold War eliminated the possibility of peace.

Craft contends that many of Koo’s goals were too lofty to be realized, given China’s instability and the international political climate. Other projects foundered because of Koo’s misinterpretation of other nations’ intentions. His advice to Chiang Kai-shek concerning the prevention of Japanese expansion was ill-suited both to China’s military power and to its political and economic influence with other nations. Despite Koo’s best efforts at conciliation and collaboration, China’s relationships with powers such as the United States and Great Britain never reached the level of partnership that he envisioned.

The V.K. Wellington Koo presented by Craft is a dynamic figure, an outsider combating domestic dissention and the imperialist impulses of various nations. He was a man of principle who clung to his convictions in the face of unceasing opposition in both his international and his domestic political relationships. Despite his significant successes, Koo’s bold dream of a future China as a progressive, democratic, and benign leader of the Asian continent has yet to be realized.

以下2004年3月以前出版之精裝本新書

Pioneer in Tibet : The Life and Perils of Dr. Albert Shelton,by Douglas Wissing (Author), Palgrave Macmillan; (March 18, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Douglas Wissing is an independent scholar and freelance journalist. His articles have appeared in The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, travel magazines, and Salon.com. Wissing lives in Bloomington, IN.


Book Description
Dr. Albert Shelton was a medical missionary and explorer who spent nearly twenty years in the Tibetan borderlands at the start of the last century. During the Great Game era, the Sheltons' sprawling station in Kham was the most remote and dangerous mission on earth. Raising his family in a land of banditry and civil war, caught between a weak Chinese government and the British Raj, Shelton proved to be a resourceful frontiersman. One of the West's first interpreters of Tibetan culture, during the course of his work in Tibet, he was praised by the Western press as a family man, revered doctor, respected diplomat, and fearless adventurer. To the American public, Dr. Albert Shelton was Daniel Boone, Wyatt Earp, and the apostle Paul on a new frontier. Driven by his goal of setting up a medical mission within Lhasa, the seat of the Dalai Lama and a city off-limits to Westerners for hundreds of years, Shelton acted as a valued go-between for the Tibetans and Chinese. Recognizing his work, the Dalai Lama issued Shelton an invitation to Lhasa. Tragically, while finalizing his entry, Shelton was shot to death on a remote mountain trail in the Himalayas. Set against the exciting history of early twentieth century Tibet and China, Pioneer in Tibet offers a window into the life of a dying breed of adventurer.
V.K. Wellington Koo and the Emergence of Modern China, by Stephen G. Craft, University Press of Kentucky; (April 2004).
Chinese Religion and Society : The Transformation of a Field (2 volumes), by John Lagerwey (Editor),The Chinese University Press; (March 15, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
Book Description
These volumes contain a selection of twenty-one essays presented in a conference convened jointly by the ...cole franÁaise d'ExtrÍme-Orient and the Centre for the Study of Religion and Chinese Society of the Chinese University of Hong Kong, on "Religion and Chinese Society: The Transformation of a Field and Its Implications for the Study of Chinese Culture". The collection aims at providing as wide a coverage as possible of recent research in the history of Chinese religion and seeks to draw some tentative conclusions about the implications for the study of Chinese religion and society in general.
The Retreat of the Elephants: An Environmental History of China, by Mark Elvin, Yale Univ Pr; (March 10, 2004)
Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover
"A classic. . . . a work of quite staggering scholarship of a kind that very few historians have achieved in the post-second world war period." - Richard Grove, Center for World Environmental History, University of Sussex


About the Author
Mark Elvin is professor of Chinese history at the Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, Australian National University, Canberra. Author of The Pattern of the Chinese Past and other works, he has taught at Oxford, Cambridge, Paris, and Heidelberg, and been a visiting research fellow at Harvard.


Book Description
This is the first environmental history of China during the three thousand years for which there are written records. It is also a treasure trove of literary, political, aesthetic, scientific, and religious sources, that allow the reader direct access to the views and feelings of the Chinese people towards their environment and their landscape. Elvin chronicles the spread of the Chinese style of farming that eliminated the habitat of the elephants that populated the country alongside much of its original wildlife; the destruction of most of the forests; the impact of war on the environmental transformation of the landscape; and the re-engineering of the countryside through water-control systems, some of gigantic size. He documents the histories of three contrasting localities within China to show how ecological dynamics defined the lives of the inhabitants. And he shows that China in the eighteenth century, on the eve of the modern era, was probably more environmentally degraded than northwestern Europe around this time. Indispensable for its new perspective on long-term Chinese history and its explanation of the roots of China's present-day environmental crisis, this book opens a door into the Chinese past.

Pacing the Void: T'Ang Approaches to the Stars, by Edward H. Schafer, Floating World Edithions; (March 2004)
Chinese Silk: A Cultural History,by Shelagh Vainker, Rutgers University Press; (March 2004)
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Shelagh Vainker is the author of Chinese Pottery and Porcelain and coauthor of The British Museum Book of Chinese Art. Formerly a curator in the Department of Oriental Antiquities at the British Museum, she is now assistant keeper of Eastern Art at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford.


Book Description
Silk is one of China’s major contributions to world civilization, the secrets of its cultivation closely guarded for generations. The famous network of trade routes between West and East is still known as the Silk Road. The organization and techniques of Chinese silk production, the uses of the silk produced––both bolts and made-up pieces––and the types and styles of its ornament are celebrated in this richly illustrated and accessible book, the first general survey to be published in English.

Shelagh Vainker traces the cultural history of silk in China from its Neolithic origins to the twentieth century and considers its relationship to the other decorative arts. She traces the role of silk in Chinese history, trade, religion, and literature. Drawing on the most recent archaeological evidence from other, less perishable, media such as jades and bronzes—as well as paintings, poems, and other texts—Chinese Silk brings together material available until now only in Chinese. Recent acquisitions by public and private collections in the United States and Europe are also noted. The result is a book that illuminates the luxury of silk throughout the ages.

Cult of Happiness: Nianhua, Art, and History in Rural North China, by Phyllis Flanoff, Univ of British Columbia; (March 2004)
God and Caesar in China: Policy Implications of Church-State Tensions, by Jason Kindopp, Carol Lee Hamrin (Editor),1
Holy War in China: The Muslim Rebellion and State in Chinese Central Asia, 1864-1877,by Hodong Kim,Stanford Univ Pr; (March 2004)
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Hodong Kim is Professor of History at Seoul National University.


Book Description
This is the first comprehensive and balanced history of a major Muslim rebellion in northwest China in the late nineteenth century, which led to the establishment of an independent Islamic state under Ya'qub Beg. That independence was lost in 1877, when the Qing army recaptured the region and incorporated it into the Chinese state, where it remains, somewhat uneasily, as the large Xinjiang-Uyghur Autonomous Region.

This is the first English-language history of the rebellion since 1878, and the only one to be based on a primary sources in Islamic languages as well as Chinese, complemented by British and Ottoman archival documents and secondary sources in Russian, English, Japanese, Chinese, French, German, and Turkish.

Japan's Imperial Dilemma in China the Tientsin Incident, 1939-1940, by Sebastian Swann, Taylor & Francis; (March 2004)
Editorial Reviews
Book Description
This book examines the blockade by the Japanese occupying army in China of the British and French settlements in the Chinese Treaty Port of Tientsin in 1939 and why it escalated into a major international issue.

Mao and the Chinese Revolution,by Yves Chevrier, et al, Interlink Pub Group; (March 2004)

Editorial Reviews
Book Description
It has been more than a century since the birth of Mao Zedong. From the collapse of the old Chinese Empire in 1912 to the foundation of the People's Republic in 1949, his history is linked with that of contemporary China, and beyond national borders, with the history of communism as well. His version of guerilla warfare and revolution resulted in the construction of a socialist society that became a model of socialism throughout the world.

Both a tyrant and rebel, Mao wanted to rule through revolution. Yet the Big Leap Forward (1958) and the Cultural Revolution (1966) each plunged China into chaos without saving it from totalitarianism. After 1978, de-Maoization and economic reforms by Deng Xiaoping helped heal the country's wounds, but the future yet remains uncertain.

Whether to be an empire united or broken, serenely "open" or in conflict, democratic or authoritarian, egalitarian or prosperous-so many lingering questions remain of those that Mao and his generation began asking nearly a century ago. Was the Maoist Revolution futile? Would China have been better off without Mao-and is such a thing imaginable? AUTHOR BIO: Yves Chevrier is a professor of modern and contemporary Chinese studies at the School of Eastern Languages (INALCO) and at the Paris Institute of Political Studies. He is the author of numerous books on 20th-century China.

 

Mao's Road to Power: The New Stage (August 1937-1938) (Mao's Road to Power, 6), by Stuart R. Schram (Editor), M.E.Sharpe; (March 2004)
Pacing the Void: T'Ang Approaches to the Stars, by Edward H. Schafer, Floating World Edithions; (March 2004)
Silk Road: Monks, Warriors & Merchants on The Silk Road, by Luce Boulnois, Helen Loveday (Translator), Odyssey Publications; (February 16, 2004)
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Luce Boulnois was born in France in 1931. She studied Chinese and Russian at the National Institute of Oriental Languages and Civilizations (INALCO) in Paris. After receiving her degree, she spent seven years as a translator. It was during this period that her interest in the Soviet republics of Central Asia began. From 1958, she carried out research work on the Silk Road which led, four years later, to the publication of her first book, The Silk Road (Arthaud). The book was a great success and was translated into a dozen languages, including Chinese and Japanese.


Book Description
To the modern reader, the Silk Road conjures up images of fabled cities and exotic lands, of long-gone empires and great conquerors. In this authoritative book, Luce Boulnois explores the encounter between East and West across the vast continental expanse that separates the Mediterranean world from the Chinese one. She unravels in a clear and compelling way the complex threads that make up the history of these great overland trade routes, which allowed the transmission across the world of ideas and beliefs, techniques and works of art, helping to shape the civilizations that flourished along the way. How did the Romans, following in the footsteps of the Greeks, discover these far-flung regions? What did the Chinese know of the European world? How did they manage to keep the secret of silk manufacture safe for centuries? Did Marco Polo really go to China, or was he just a clever impostor? But the importance of Central Asia is not just a thing of the past, and the author discusses its significance in the modern world in cultural and geopolitical terms, including the implications of the most recent events taking place there.
• Written by an internationally-renowned authority on the Silk Road who has spent a lifetime researching and writing on the subject
• The author's knowledge of both Russian and Chinese enables her to make use of sources previously unavailable to western readers
• Translated from the best-selling French edition. Previous editions have been best-sellers and are available in almost a dozen languages
• Listing of selected museums around the world where Silk Road treasures may best be seen
• 26 color photographs
• 15 easy-to-read maps

Late Qing China and Meiji Japan: Political and Cultural Aspects, by Joshua A. Fogel (Editor), Eastbridge; (February 1, 2004).
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Bob Tadashi Wakabayashi teaches Japanese history at York University in Toronto, Canada. His principal publications include: Anti-Foreignism and Western Learning in Early-Modern Japan (Harvard); Japanese Loyalism Reconstrued (Hawai‘i); and as co-editor Opium Regimes: China, Britain, and Japan, 1839-1952 (Stanford).

Douglas Howland teaches East Asian history at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. He has written Translating the West: Language and Political Reason in Nineteenth-Century Japan (Hawai‘i); and Borders of Chinese Civilization: Geography and History at Empire's End (Duke).

Li Tingjiang teaches modern history and politics at Chūō University in Tokyo. He had written extensively in Chinese and Japanese on Japanese advisors to the late Qing court.

Lu Yan teaches East Asian history at the University of New Hampshire. Her first book, due out soon, is entitled: Understanding Japan: Chinese Perspectives, 1895–1945 (Hawa‘i).

Margaret Mehl is now teaching Japanese history at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark. His major publication in English is History and the state in nineteenth-century Japan (St. Martin’s).

Paula Harrell is an independent scholar with a Ph.D. from Columbia University. Her major book is Sowing the Seeds of Change: Chinese Students, Japanese Teachers, 1895-1905 (Stanford).

Tao Demin has taught in China, Japan, and the United States. He presently teaches at Kansai University in Osaka, Japan. He has written: Kaitokudō Nihon Shushigaku no kenkyū (A study of the Japanese school of Zhu Xi learning in the Kaitokudō) (Osaka University Press); and Nihon Kangaku shisō shi ronkō: Sorai Nakamoto oyobi kindai (Studies in the history of Chinese learning in Japan: Ogyū Sorai, Tominaga Nakamoto, and modernity) (Kansai University Press).

Juliette Yueh-tsen Chung is an independent school with a Ph. D. from the University of Chicago. She has written Struggle for National Survival: Eugenics in Sino-Japanese Contexts, 1896-1945 (Routledge).

Joshua A. Fogel teaches East Asian history at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He has published, most recently, The Literature of Travel in the Japanese Rediscovery of China, 1862-1945 (Stanford); Politics and Sinology: The Case of Naitō Konan (1866-1934) (Harvard); and as editor, Sagacious Monks and Bloodthirsty Warriors: Chinese Views of Japan in the Ming-Qing Period (EastBridge).

Book Description
The roots of modern Sino-Japanese relations lie in the intense cultural and political exchanges which blossomed in the mid-1850s extending into the late 1920s.

Scholarly interest has grown over the last two decades in the interaction between China and Japan during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. While much of that interest has centered on the wars fought in the period, Late Qing China and Meiji Japan looks instead at the confluence between Chinese and Japanese history. Focusing on the cultural and political spheres, this volume places those relationships at center stage and presents a distinct new field of Sino-Japanese interactions that, while related to Chinese and Japanese history, has an integrity of its own.

Late Qing China and Meiji Japan covers the last years of the Tokugawa regime through the end of the Meiji era and into the early Taishō period — roughly the 1850s through the 1920s — and the last decades of the Qing empire through the first of the fledgling Chinese Republic. This was, without a doubt, the most intense period of Sino-Japanese intercourse in history. Actual contacts between Chinese and Japanese were renewed on a regular basis for the first time in centuries. Japanese began traveling to all parts of China. Thousands of young Chinese, male and female, flocked to Japanese institutions of higher learning, and hundreds of Japanese instructors were invited to teach at Chinese schools.

It all tragically came to an end with Japan’s military invasion of the mainland in the 1930s and only began to be resumed in the 1980s.

Before Mao : The Untold Story of Li Lisan and the Creation of Communist China, by Patrick Lescot (Author), Ecco; (February 3, 2004) .
Frontier Passages: Ethnopolitics and the Rise of Chinese Communism, 1921-1945, by Xiaoyuan Liu, Stanford University Press; (February 2004)
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Xiaoyuan Liu is an Associate Professor of History at Iowa State University and a recent Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington.


Book Description
In this pathbreaking book, Xiaoyuan Liu establishes the ways in which the history of the Chinese Communist Party was, from the Yan’an period onward, intertwined with the ethnopolitics of the Chinese "periphery." As a Han-dominated party, the CCP had to adapt to an inhospitable political environment, particularly among the Hui (Muslims) of northwest China and the Mongols of Inner Mongolia. Based on a careful examination of CCP and Soviet Comintern documents only recently available, Liu’s study shows why the CCP found itself unable to follow the Russian Bolshevik precedent by inciting separatism among the non-Han peoples as a stratagem for gaining national power. Rather than swallowing Marxist-Leninist dogma on "the nationalities question," the CCP took a position closer to that of the Kuomintang, stressing the inclusiveness of the Han-dominated Chinese nation, "Zhongua Minzu."
Gardens of Pleasure: Eroticism and Art in China, by Ferdinand M. Bertholet, Jacques Pimpaneau, Prestel USA; (February 2004)
Editorial Reviews
Book Description
These sublime examples from the world’s largest collection of Chinese erotic art offer a rare glimpse behind the curtains of censorship into a realm of aesthetic beauty, symbolism, and harmony.

Erotic art figures prominently in China’s artistic heritage, from the age of Confucius through the late nineteenth century. This sumptuous collection of more than one hundred color illustrations—many of them never before published—introduces readers to a variety of artistic evocations of love and sex. The authors trace the influence of religions and historical events on sexual practices, exploring differences in imagery, style, and technique. As intellectually compelling as it is fascinating, this volume is ornamented with verses that match the age and mood of each work of art, and is augmented with essays on the history of the art form and of the collection itself.

 

Heterodoxy in Late Imperial China, by Kwang-Ching Liu (Contributor), Richard Shek (Editor), University of Hawaii Press; (February 2004)
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Kwang-Ching Liu is emeritus professor of history at the University of California, Davis. Richard Shek is professor of humanities at California State University, Sacramento.

Contributors: P. Richard Bohr, David Faure, Wen-Hsiung Hsu, Paul R. Katz, Whalen W. Lai, Kwang-Ching Liu, Don C. Price, Richard Shek, Donald S. Sutton.

Book Description
Cultural and intellectual protests, while rare, were recurrent in Chinese society. This impressive and comprehensive work traces the origins of dissent to elements of Daoism and Buddhism in the Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) dynasties and expands on their significance in modern times. Daoists and Buddhists were often conservative, coexisting in a society distinguished by entrenched institutions--monarchical, bureaucratic, and familial. Yet dissenting ideas and movements did arise, and society was not so rigid as to preclude the critical impulse. Countervalues found expression in elite philosophical thought and, less articulately, in popular religious movements.

In a series of well-documented case studies ranging over the centuries, contributors examine aspects of early Daoism and Buddhism as essential background to the sectarian movements of the Ming and the Qing periods. They take up White Lotus ("Eternal Mother") millenarianism prior to and during the eighteenth century and the Triads of the nineteenth, who were, it seems, only politically heterodox. Finally the most radical and populist traditions are explored: the quasi-Christian Taipings of the nineteenth century and the elite Republican movement of the early twentieth.

Heterodoxy in Late Imperial China attempts to define the efforts of groups and individuals to propose alternatives to the formidable socioethical orthodoxy of China's heritage. By approaching modern China from its long-standing tradition of dissent, it provides essential reading for those seeking the enduring themes of China's nonofficial history and especially the transition between the late imperial and modern eras.

 

History of Warfare in China: Antiquity Through the Spring and Autumn Period, by R. Sawyer, Westview Press; (February 2004)
Mao (Routledge Historical Biographies), by Michael Lynch, Peter Lynch, Routledge; (February 2004)
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Michael Lynch teaches history at the University of Leicester.


Book Description
Michael Lynch presents an engaging and thorough account of Mao's life and politics, making use of a wealth of primary and secondary sources. He locates Maoism in the broader context of twentieth-century Chinese history, discussing the development of the Chinese Communist Party, the creation of the People's Republic of China and the Cultural Revolution, and the part of Mao's China in the Cold War. Details of Mao's private life as well as his political and philosophical thought add to this diverse picture of the influential leader.
Picturing Cathay: Maritime and Cultural Images of the China Trade, by Hong Kong University Museum and Art Gallery, Hong Kong University Museum and Art Gall, Hong Kong Univ Pr; Bilingual edition (February 2004)
 Editorial Reviews
Book Description
Features China trade paintings and export art works dating from the late 18th and 19th centuries. It focuses on the importance of maritime trade in encouraging cultural contact between East and West, and in the development of Chinese export art. The works include early paintings and drawings that were intended to document China and portraits of the people and vessels that were involved in the China trade. The majority of the paintings are port scenes of Canton and other later treaty ports; others depict the Chinese and their way of life. A number of export items including ceramics and carvings are also included. The catalogue contains essays by William Shang, Patrick Conner, and William Sargent on the historical importance of Chinese export art, the artist George Chinnery, and China trade paintings for the American market.
The Power of Position: Beijing University, Intellectuals, and Chinese Political Culture, 1898-1929 (Berkeley Series in Interdisciplinary Studies of China, 3), by Timothy B. Weston, University of California Press; (February 2004)
Editorial Reviews
About the Author
Timothy B. Weston is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He is coeditor of China Beyond the Headlines (2000).
Rhapsody in Red: How Classical Music Became Chinese, by Sheila Melvin, Agathon Press; (February 2004)
The Role of Japan in Liang Qichao's Introduction of Modern Western Civilization to China (China Research Monographs, No. 57.), by Joshua A. Fogel (Editor), Institute of East Asian Studies; (February 2004)
Sovereignty and Authenticity: Manchukuo and the East Asian Modern, by Prasenjit Duara, Rowman & Littlefield; (February 2004)
Shashibiya: Staging Shakespeare in China, by Li Ruru, Ruru Li, Hong Kong Univ Pr; (February 2004)
Editorial Reviews
Book Description
An intriguing discussion of the levels of "filtering" that any Shakespeare performance in China undergoes, and a close examination of how these "filters" reflect the continually changing political, social and cultural practices. The study traces the history of Shakespeare performance in China over the past hundred years, focussing in detail on eleven productions in mainstream, operatic and experimental forms in the post-Mao era. The author’s unusually intimate knowledge of her subject, and her personal involvement in three of the productions she discusses, makes this the most up-to-date research available on staging Shakespeare in China.
Historical Records of the Five Dynasties (Translations from the Asian Classics), by Xiu Ouyang, Richard L. Davis,Columbia University Press; (February 2004)
  Editorial Reviews
Review
Richard Davis's wonderfully fluent translation makes available in English one of the most important histories of the period between the Tang and Song dynasties. In recent years historians have come to realize just how important this fifty years was to China's overall development for many of the innovations that the Song pioneered actually dated to this time. This translation provides entree for anyone interested in this period, whether a starting student or an advanced scholar.


Book Description
Until now, no historical text from China's middle period has ever been translated into English, except in fragments. Here at last is the first major Chinese historical work from the Song dynasty. Written by an intellectual giant of the eleventh century, Ouyang Xiu, this is a history of the preceding century, the Five Dynasties. Richard Davis, a preeminent scholar of Chinese history, has provided a thorough introduction. Roughly two-thirds of the Chinese original has been rendered into English, and sections critical to understanding the politics and personality of the time appear in full. Biographical clusters based on moral categories also appear in full, helping readers to appreciate the Confucian agenda that informs the work.

Comparative Essays in Early Greek and Chinese Rational Thinking, by Jean-Paul Reding, Ashgate Publishing Company; (January 2004)
British Naturalists in Qing China: Science, Empire, and Cultural Encounter, by Fa-TI Fan,Harvard Univ Pr; (January 2004)
  Editorial Reviews About the Author
Fa-ti Fan is Assistant Professor of History at the State University of New York at Binghamton.

Book Description
Although natural history was the most far-reaching Western scientific enterprise undertaken in China, it has largely been neglected by historians. How did British naturalists and their Chinese associates explore, study, and represent China’s natural world within the social and cultural context of the late Qing empire? In seeking to address these questions, Fan reconstructs and explains the aims, methods, and achievements of naturalists’ research in a China coming to grips with Western powers. He investigates how natural history, horticulture, Chinese export art, folk knowledge, and Sinology converged in the scientific representation of the natural history of China. Scientific practice and knowledge took shape, as he shows, in the cultural "borderlands," during a critical period in Sino-Western relations.
Any understanding of the British venture into natural history in China depends on seeing the Chinese participants as multidimensional actors in the crafting of this scientific undertaking. Just as the naturalists had a variety of agendas in their pursuit of scientific knowledge, the Chinese entered the relationship because it offered opportunities to forge profitable alliances, enlarge their fortunes, and enrich their lives. Whatever the power relations between the Western naturalists and the Chinese might have been, both groups tried to make sense of their encounters. The relationships between the naturalists and the Chinese who helped them were not necessarily culture- or nation-bound, Fan concludes: "Historical actors negotiated their identities and roles just as we do."

Comparative Essays in Early Greek and Chinese Rational Thinking, by Jean-Paul Reding, Ashgate Publishing Company; (January 2004)
A Plague upon Humanity: The Secret Genocide of Axis Japan's Germ Warfare Operation, by Daniel Barenblatt, HarperCollins Publishers, January 6, 2004.
  Editorial Reviews
From Publishers Weekly
Only last year did a Japanese court acknowledge that Japanese germ warfare experiments in China took place during WWII. A useful overview of the history of biological warfare provides a historical context for the gruesome experiments on humans that began in northern China in the early 1930s, linked to the military expansion Japan began during the 1930s and fathered by scientist Shiro Ishii, who figures prominently in the book among the 20,000 Japanese professionals involved (some of whom knowingly distributed tainted food). The accounts of experiments on humans and massive germ warfare attacks against civilians-more than 400,000 Chinese died of cholera after two attacks in 1943-include the testimony of Chinese victims and witnesses as well as some Japanese. While most atrocities were committed against Chinese and Koreans, some Westerners, including American prisoners of war, were also victims. The most thoughtful portions of the book, Washington Post contributor Barenblatt's debut, explore how such atrocities "...coldly preserve medicine's scientific devices while annihilating all its high ideals." Shameful U.S. government efforts, spearheaded by MacArthur, to protect the Japanese perpetrators from prosecution in exchange for their research, even to the extent of characterizing the only war crimes trial that prosecuted perpetrators as propaganda (it was conducted by the Soviets), are well documented. The postwar material includes highly controversial claims of America's use of biological warfare during the Korean War. Although many of the gruesome facts have been published before, Barenblatt brings together the many contexts of how Japan's war machine came to commit medical-biological war crimes on a massive scale, with a final death toll of 580,000.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

Journalist Barenblatt, an expert on Japanese biological warfare, valuably summarizes the known facts and reasonable speculations about it. Like many other aspects of science in Japan, the country's knowledge of biology was much more advanced before World War II than the rest of the world believed. Japan's biological warfare capability, carefully developed with the direct support of the emperor, had been tested upon Chinese and Western subjects and deployed operationally at the cost of as many as a million Chinese lives. After the war, cold war politics prevented war-crimes prosecution of Japanese biowar experts and may have led to the use of their talents and stocks of material in Korea (Barenblatt grants that such use has not been proven). Barenblatt's useful addition to the literature on biological warfare and WWII belongs on the same shelf as Iris Chang's The Rape of Nanking (1997) and studies of the comfort girls, where it may, however, raise the hackles of Japanese still in the dark about their country's war crimes. Roland Green
Copyright c American Library Association. All rights reserved

Book Description

In wartime Japan's bid for conquest, humanity suffered through one of its darkest hours, as a hidden genocide took the lives of hundreds of thousands of innocent people. Cloaked in secrecy and protected under the banner of scientific study, the best and brightest of Japan's medical establishment volunteered for a major initiative in support of the military that involved the systematic murder of Chinese civilians. With the help of the United States government, they were allowed to get away with it. Based on important original research, this book reveals as never before the full extent of this crime, in a story that is as compelling as it is terrifying.

Beginning in 1931, the military of Imperial Japan came up with a new strategy to further the nation's drive for expansion: germ warfare. But they needed help to figure out how to do it. So they recruited thousands of doctors and research scientists, all of whom accepted willingly, in order to develop a massive program of biological warfare that was referred to as "the secret of secrets." This covert operation consisted of horrifying human experiments and germ weapon attacks against people whose lives were seen as expendable, including Chinese men, women, and children living in Manchuria and other areas of Japanese occupation. Even American POWs were targeted.

At the forefront of this disturbing enterprise wasan elite organization known as Unit 731, led by Japan's answer to Joseph Mengele, Dr. Shiro Ishii. Under Ishii'sorders, captives were subjected to deeds that strain the boundaries of imagination. Men and women were frozen alive to study the effects of frostbite. Others were dissected without anesthesia. Tied to posts, victims were infected with virulent strains of anthrax and other diseases. Entire cities were aerially sprayed with fleas carrying bubonic plague. All told, more than five hundred thousand people died. Yet after the war, U.S. occupation forces under General Douglas MacArthur struck a deal with the doctors of Unit 731 that shielded them from accountability for their atrocities.

In this meticulously documented work, Daniel Barenblatt has drawn upon startling new evidence of Japan's germ warfare program, including firsthand accounts from both perpetrators and survivors. Authoritative, alarming, and gripping from start to finish, A Plague upon Humanity is a powerful investigation that exposes one of the most shameful chapters in human history.

 
The Chinese Revolution in Historical Perspective : Second Edition by John E. Schrecker (Author)
  Editorial Reviews
Book Description

This fully updated second edition provides a succinct and self-contained history of China. The text emphasizes the relationship between China's modern era and its past, employing a unique approach that presents the story in terms of traditional Chinese historical theories. When the West enters the scene in modern times, Schrecker fits its impact into the Chinese story, rather than the reverse, as is commonly done. This study demonstrates that traditional China was not homogeneous or changeless, thus offering a much-needed corrective to common stereotypes about other cultures that is essential for both classroom use and for the general reader.
Chiang Kai Shek : China's Generalissimo and the Nation He Lost by Jonathan Fenby (Author)
  Editorial Reviews
From Publishers Weekly

Chiang Kai-shek's life (18871975) coincided with some of the most violent and chaotic decades of Chinese history, and as this son of a salt merchant from the lower Yangtze came into his own, his destiny became increasingly entwined with the agonizing destiny of China. Many of Chiang's actions, including his 1949 flight to Taiwan, directly shaped that destiny. In this chronicle of his life, Fenby, former editor of the Observer and the South China Morning Post, recounts the generalissimo's rise amid the gruesome power struggles of warlords; the political machinations that enabled his gradual assumption of political power during the Kuomintang regime; his tortuous attempts to fend off Japanese imperial expansion while also trying to exterminate the fledgling Communist movement; and his eventual defeat at the hands of Mao's Red Army. Fenby's account of Chiang's early life is the most detailed part of the book and relies heavily on excerpts from a memoir by Chiang's second wife (whom he cast aside to forge a political marriage and strategic alliance with the youngest daughter of the powerful Soong family) and on journalistic tidbits from Western observers and participants; these accounts are always colorful and engaging if sometimes less than analytical. Whatever one might think of the man-depicted here as explosive-tempered, superhumanly ambitious, profoundly conservative and authoritarian, and not above forging alliances with underworld gang leaders-one cannot read this biography without marveling at the sheer magnitude of his arc of power and the scope and unifying impact of his life on a once-decentralized nation. B&w photos, maps.
Copyright c Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist
During the American political wars of the mid-1950s, "Who lost China?" was a question used by the Left and the Right to bludgeon each other. Of course, China was never ours to lose. If any single person can be accused of "losing" the most populous nation on earth, it has to be Chiang Kai Shek. Journalist Fenby has written the first comprehensive biography of Chiang in the past 30 years and makes skillful use of newly available sources from mainland China, Taiwan, and the West. The result is a fascinating, often surprising portrait of the man and his nation as it endured the trials of revolution, foreign occupation, and civil war. This is no simplistic exercise in Chiang bashing. Fenby consistently pays tribute to Chiang's dedication to lifting his nation out of its morass. But, as Fenby shows time and again, Chiang's egotism, stubbornness, and his often shocking ignorance of his own people doomed him to failure. This is an important work that will deepen our understanding of the past, present, and future of China. Jay Freeman
Copyright c American Library Association. All rights reserved

Book Description
With a narrative as briskly paced and vividly detailed as an international thriller, this definitive new biography of Chiang Kai-shek masterfully maps the tumultuous political career of nationalist China's Generalissimo as it reevaluates his brave but unfulfilled life. Chiang Kai-shek was one of the most influential world figures of the twentieth century. The leader of the Kuomintang, the nationalist movement in China, by 1928 he had established himself as head of the government in Nanking. While he managed to survive the political storms of the 1930s, and although he was the only Chinese statesman of sufficient stature to attend the Cairo conference with Churchill and Roosevelt during World War II, Chiang's power was continually being undermined by the Japanese on one side and the Chinese Communists on the other. Once Japan met its unequivocal defeat in 1945, civil war again erupted in China, and four years later Mao Zedong claimed victory for the Communists. Featuring pages of photographs, and drawing extensively upon original Chinese sources and accounts by contemporaneous journalists, Jonathan Fenby unfolds a story as fascinating in its conspiratorial intrigues as it is remarkable for its psychological insights.

Chinese Communists and the West: A Concise Biographical Handbook of Chinese Communism and Western Supporters by Thomas Kampen
  Editorial Reviews About the Author
Thomas Kampen teaches at the University of Heidelberg, Germany. He is the author of Mao Zedong, Zhou Enlai and the Evolution of the Chinese Communist Party.

Book Description
The 200 individuals in this biographical dictionary provided the crucial link between revolutionary movements in China, Europe, and America during the first half of the 20th century. It covers Chinese Communists who went to the West and western (European and American) communists and leftists who went to China. The book also includes many Chinese who played important roles in the international Communist movement. This is an essential reference for students, libraries, and researchers dealing with the history of modern China or the international Communist movement.

The Chinese Hsinhai Revolution: G. E. Morrison and Anglo-Japanese Relations, 1897-1920 by Eiko Woodhouse
  Editorial Reviews About the Author
Eiko Woodhouse was formerly secretary to the consul-general in the Consulate-General of Japan, Sydney and gained a PhD at the University of Sydney.

Book Description
The Chinese Hsinhai Revolution explores and explains for the first time the important role of G. E. Morrison in great power diplomacy in China from the end of the Russo-Japanese War to the overthrow of the Ming Dynasty.

Ioa: Guanyin by Patricia Eichenbaum Karetzky
 
Christianity in Modern China: The Making of the First Native Protestant Church (Studies in Christian Mission, 28) by David Cheung
  Editorial Reviews About the Author
David Cheung, Ph.D. (University of London), teaches at Asian Theological Seminary, Philippines and is a contributor to the Handbook of Christianity in China, Volume 2 (Brill, forthcoming).

Book Description
Using mainly hitherto unstudied primary materials, this monograph studies a very significant episode in Chinese Christianity. Focusing on the origins and earliest history of Protestantism in South Fujian, this analytical-critical study investigates the evolution of the churches which pioneered in indigenisation and ecclesiastical union in China during the nineteenth century.
Some subjects studied are primitive missionary objectives and methods, the relationship between the ‘Talmage ideal’ and the Three-self concept, and the nature and dynamics of ‘native’ religious work. Extremely useful is the critical assessment of South Fujian in terms of self-propagation, self-government, self-support and organic union. The key areas suggested for future research are also quite thought-provoking. The volume is especially valuable to social and church historians, missiologists and sociologists.

Empire Made Me: An Englishman Adrift in Shanghai by Robert A. Bickers
  Richard Maurice Tinkler was an ordinary man in an extraordinary time and place. This riveting "biography of a nobody" offers a rare glimpse of imperialism and the making of modern China seen from the perspective of a working-class Englishman enforcing the order of everyday life on the streets of Shanghai. Culled from Tinkler’s many personal letters, Empire Made Me meticulously documents his astonishingly revealing life in the service of the British Empire between 1919 and 1939, one of hundreds of young men who joined the Shanghai Municipal Police. Responsible for maintaining order in Shanghai’s International Settlement, the SMP expanded and enforced British dominion in China’s most important political, commercial, and cultural center.

Tinkler would have remained just another anonymous and forgotten colonial policeman were it not for his unexpected death, at the hands of Japanese marines and an incompetent local doctor, in June 1939. His suspicious death created a noisy diplomatic incident that was picked up by journalists and splashed across the front pages of Britain’s newspapers. Many of Tinkler’s personal letters survived, and they describe his personal life in unusually vivid detail, including his relationships, his knowing masculinity, his travels, and his bitter meditations on his lowly position in a powerful but waning empire.

Robert Bickers absorbing biography uses Tinkler’s letters as well as extensive archival research to tell the story of this man’s everyday life and violent decline in a colonial world -a story that offers an uncommonly candid history of twentieth-century imperialism.

Fire and Water: The Art of Incendiary and Aquatic Warfare in China by Ralph D. Sawyer, Mei-Chun Lee Sawyer
  Editorial Reviews About the Author
Ralph D. Sawyer, one of the leading scholars of Chinese warfare, has also worked extensively with major military and intelligence agencies. After study at MIT, Harvard, and National Taiwan University, and a brief period of university teaching, Sawyer has spent the past thirty years in international consulting work throughout Asia. Working from a strong technical and intelligence background, he has focused his research on the theory and practice of warfare in China, both traditional and contemporary.

Book Description
An expert in Chinese Warfare, best-selling author Ralph Sawyer, offers a compelling account of the development of incendiary and aquatic warfare tactics in ancient China as pivotal elements in turning the tides of battle.
China's official histories are replete with intriguing examples of incendiary and aquatic warfare being employed (particularly by the outnumbered) in pivotal roles to turn the tide of battle. In his new book Fire and Water, best-selling author Ralph Sawyer traces the dynamic evolution and development of incendiary warfare in ancient China, from antiquity through the introduction of true gunpowder weapons, including cannon and muskets. Discussing both use and techniques, the book similarly unfolds the evolution of aquatic methodology, emphasizing the strong interconnection between the two with the inception of riverine combat. Fundamentally based upon an examination of the Chinese military writings, Sawyer examines and recounts the most important clashes and epochal conflicts in which these dramatic tactics were employed over the centuries. Although not a naval history, Sawyer does examine the extensive employment of incendiary attacks in naval conflict and explores the means for overcoming riverine obstacles, such as floating bridges.

From Cotton Mill to Business Empire: The Emergence of Regional Enterprises in Modern China (Harvard East Asian Monographs, 229) by Elisabeth Koll
 
The Great Wall (Images of Asia) by William Lindesay
  Editorial Reviews About the Author

English-born William Lindesay was the first foreigner to traverse the whole length of the Great Wall, in 1987. He recounted his adventure in Alone on the Great Wall (Hodder & Stoughton). He now is with the China Features Department of Xinhua News Agency. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Book Description
During China's recent tourism boom, the Great Wall has become one of the most recognizable images of China, Asia, and the world. This book provides a systematic explanation and scholarly interpretation of the Great Wall, offering common sense theories about its methods of construction, performance, and fate based upon years of fieldwork.

Old Advertisements and Popular Culture: Posters, Calendars, and Cigarettes, 1900-1950
by Chaonan Chen, Yiyou Feng
   
The Secret History of the Mongols: A Mongolian Epic Chronicle of the Thirteenth Century (Brill's Inner Asian Library, 7) by Igor De Rachewiltz
  Editorial Reviews About the Author
Igor De Rachewiltz, Ph.D. (1961) in Chinese History, The Australian National University, has published extensively on the political and cultural history of China and Mongolia in the 12th-14th centuries, and on Sino-Mongolian philology. He is at present a Visiting Fellow in the Pacific and Asian History Division of the ANU.

Book Description
The 13th century Secret History of the Mongols, covering the great Einggis Qan’s (1162-1227) ancestry and life, stands out as a literary monument of first magnitude. Written partly in prose and partly in epic poetry, it is the major native source on Einggis Qan, also dealing with part of the reign of his son and successor Ogodei (1229-41).
This true handbook contains an historical introduction, a full translation of the chronicle in accessible English, plus an extensive commentary. Indispensable for the historian, the Sino-Mongolist, the Altaic philologist, and anyone interested in comparative literature and Central Asian folklore.

Seeing through Zen : Encounter, Transformation, and Genealogy in Chinese Chan Buddhism
by John R. McRae
  Editorial Reviews About the Author
John R. McRae is Associate Professor of East Asian Buddhism in the Department of Religious Studies at Indiana University.

Book Description
The tradition of Chan Buddhism--more popularly known as Zen--has been romanticized throughout its history. In this book, John R. McRae shows how modern critical techniques, supported by recent manuscript discoveries, make possible a more skeptical, accurate, and--ultimately--productive assessment of Chan lineages, teaching, fundraising practices, and social organization. Synthesizing twenty years of scholarship, Seeing through Zen offers new, accessible analytic models for the interpretation of Chan spiritual practices and religious history.
Writing in a lucid and engaging style, McRae traces the emergence of this Chinese spiritual tradition and its early figureheads, Bodhidharma and the "sixth patriarch" Huineng, through the development of Zen dialogue and koans. In addition to constructing a central narrative for the doctrinal and social evolution of the school, Seeing through Zen examines the religious dynamics behind Chan's use of iconoclastic stories and myths of patriarchal succession. McRae argues that Chinese Chan is fundamentally genealogical, both in its self-understanding as a school of Buddhism and in the very design of its practices of spiritual cultivation. Furthermore, by forgoing the standard idealization of Zen spontaneity, we can gain new insight into the religious vitality of the school as it came to dominate the Chinese religious scene, providing a model for all of East Asia--and the modern world. Ultimately, this book aims to change how we think about Chinese Chan by providing new ways of looking at the tradition.

Philosophy, Philology, and Politics in Eighteenth-Century China : Li Fu and the Lu-Wang School under the Ch'ing by C. S. Huang
  Editorial Reviews / Book Description
This book explains the general intellectual climate of the early Ch'ing period, and the political and cultural characteristics of the Ch'ing regime at the time. Professor Huang brings to life the book's central characters, Li Fu and the three great emperors he served: K'ang-hsi, Yung-cheng, and Chien-lung. Although the author's main concern is to explain the contributions of Li Fu to the Lu-Wang school of Confucianism, he also gives a clear, succinct account of the Lu-Wang and Ch'eng-Chu schools from the twelfth century to the eighteenth.