English

2012 New History
P. O. Box 1-44, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan, R. O. C.
02-2782-9555 # 226

The Society for the Study of Chinese History of Japan and the Transition of Modern China: A Discussion of Keiji Adachi’s On the History of the Autocratic State

Yao-huang Chen

Graduate Institute of History, National Chengchi University

There have been two trends in Ming-Ch’ing studies in Japan since the late 1970s. The first trend, set by the Society for the Study of Chinese History, persisted in the Marxism that deeply influenced Japanese historical circles since the end of World War II and tried to overcome the theory of unilinear development. Keiji Adachi was the forerunner of Ming-Ch’ing studies in this Association. The other trend tried to break through the traditional framework based on Marxism and was represented by such historians as Masao Mori, who were not accepted by the traditional scholars, but welcomed by younger historians like Mio Kishimoto. Historians like Masao Mori and Mio Kishimoto were well known to scholars in Taiwan, but the Society for the Study of Chinese History was unfamiliar to Taiwanese readers. For example, Keiji Adachi, the historian this article will discuss, is still not accepted by scholars in Taiwan as far as I know. This article will introduce briefly some perspectives of the Chinese Historical Studies Association on the economic and political transition of modern China through a discussion of Keiji Adachi’s On the History of the Autocratic State.

 

Keywords: the Society for the Study of Chinese History (Japan), Keiji Adachi, Autocratic State